Louisa the rabid fan

Louisa May Alcott hated being famous. Or so she said. Stories abounded of how she often masqueraded as a maid before answering the door at Orchard House to discourage would-be fans. She knew that readers imagined her looking like the dashing young Jo with her two tails of chestnut hair flying behind her when in …

Introducing “From the Garret”

This blog has certainly been a journey! When I first started, all I wanted to do was share my love of Louisa with other fans. I never thought I would grow to love reading and writing as much as I do. It's been a creative renaissance! Different writers' blogs that I follow (Jeff Goins, Michael …

Louisa May Alcott, scrapbook-style

I loved this scrapbook image of Louisa and wanted to share it with you. It comes from a cool website called Studio Girls Scrapbookgraphics and it's a  public scrapbooking forum. Are you passionate about Louisa May Alcott too? Send an email to louisamayalcottismypassion@gmail.com to subscribe, and never miss a post! Facebook Louisa May Alcott is …

Beautiful Little Women book covers

Check out all the beautiful book covers of Little Women from its publication to the present - quite a collection. Nice summary too, here's a tease:  The Reference Guide to American Literature describes the creation of the book(s) in this way: “Alcott’s purpose in writing Little Women was not to create a nostalgic portrait of an idyllic childhood, …

Today in Alcott history …

The American Literary Blog reports: The first of what became four installments of Hospital Sketches was published in the magazine Boston Commonwealth on May 22, 1863. Later, in book form, it carried the subtitle "An Army Nurse's True Account of Her Experiences During the Civil War." The author, Louisa May Alcott, had spent about six weeks …

For Moms and their ‘Little Women’

In honor of Mother's Day, I am delighted to present this guest post by Barbara Solomon Josselsohn,  reprinted with permission from NYMetroParents. A two-day trip to Concord, Massachusetts and the home of Louisa May Alcott, author of Little Women, is a great way to commemorate Mother’s Day—or any other time set aside just for the …

Book Review: The Glory Cloak

By way of review (as mentioned in the previous post), The Glory Cloak by Patricia O’Brien is an historical novel featuring Louisa May Alcott and Clara Barton. It covers the Civil War through the eyes of a fictitious Alcott cousin, Susan Gray, who comes to live with the Alcotts after being orphaned. Susan becomes Louisa’s …

Louisa has primed my pump and changed my life

I happened to stumble upon a great find: The Glory Cloak by Patricia O'Brien, an historical novel featuring Louisa May Alcott and Clara Barton. It covers the Civil War through the eyes of a fictitious Alcott cousin, Susan Gray, who comes to live with the Alcotts after being orphaned. Susan becomes Louisa's constant companion, confidant …

Concord’s all a-buzz about the centennial of Orchard House

Thursday's Boston Globe (March 8, 2012) ran a wonderful spread in their Globe West section on all the festivities taking place this spring in Concord in honor of Orchard House's centennial as a museum. Here's a teaser with a link to the rest of the article. The online version didn't carry the great pictures so …

Louisa’s calling card

I just found an article from the Rauner Library Blog from Dartmouth College detailing the story behind the calling card. The article features the calling cards of such luminaries as Louisa May Alcott, Mark Twain, Nathaniel Hawthorne and Charles Dickens among others. These cards all have pictures. I never knew anything about the nature of …