A conversation with Anne Boyd Rioux on “Meg, Jo, Beth, Amy: The Story of Little Women and Why It Still Matters”

Back in July at the Summer Conversational Series at Louisa May Alcott's Orchard House, I had the privilege of conversing with author and Alcott scholar Anne Boyd Rioux about her new book, Meg, Jo, Beth, Amy: The Story of Little Women and Why It Still Matters. You can listen in as I fashioned it into a …

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Summer Conversational Series 2018: Cathlin Davis “Learning to Be Herself: Alcott’s Lessons in Peer Pressure”

Note: This is a long post of over 3000 words. It’s also a core topic of Little Women’s relevancy for teenagers especially when it comes to conformity versus non-conformity, and peer pressure. It’s well worth the read for those of us who wish to pass down Little Women to our daughters and sons, nieces and …

Summer Conversational Series 2018: All-star panel discusses the legacy of Little Women

Note: I am pleased to present this guest post by British Alcott scholar Kristina West. On Sunday 15 July 1879, Bronson Alcott opened the first session of the Concord School of Philosophy; on the same date in 1879, Louisa May Alcott was the first woman in Concord to register to vote. In 1868, this day …

Summer Conversational Series 2018: Anne Boyd Rioux: “Meg, Jo, Beth, Amy: The Story of Little Women and Why It Still Matters”

The last lecture of the day was given by Anne Boyd Rioux on her new book, Meg, Jo, Beth, Amy: The Story of Little Women and Why It Still Matters. First encounter with Little Women Anne did not read Little Women as a child; it had not given to her by her mother or grandmother. …

Summer Conversational Series 2018: Elif Armbruster: “‘I rather miss my wild girl:’ Reclaiming Jo March as an original “Nasty Woman.”

Elif Armbruster is a new voice to the Summer Conversational Series. An Associate Professor of English at Suffolk University in Boston, she specializes mid-to-late 19th and early 20th century women’s literature. With the conception of both the “Nasty Woman” and #metoo movements, Elif developed a course on notable Nasty Women in literature. Of course, Jo …

Summer Conversational Series 2018: John Matteson: “Little Women at 150: A conversation”

The day began with a conversation with the venerable, entertaining and much-loved Pultizer-prize-winning Alcott author and scholar John Matteson. He remarked on his good fortune to have this association with Orchard House and everyone present admitting that “I come here and I don’t feel worthy.” The kindness, goodness, and dedication that he feels every time …

Why Little Women still matters: A review of Meg, Jo, Beth, Amy by Anne Boyd Rioux

This year marks the 150th anniversary of the publication of a classic read by millions around the globe. Written by Louisa May Alcott, a writer under duress fulfilling the assignment of an insistent publisher, Little Women, in the words of Anne Boyd Rioux is the “paradigmatic book about growing up, especially for the female half …