A clash of civilizations, a loss of one’s heritage, and the courage to change: A review of Flight of the Sparrow by Amy Belding Brown

Note: When Amy Belding Brown asked me to review her latest book, I jumped at the chance; Mr. Emerson’s Wife had been a game-changing book for me. I smiled when I read of her interest in finding out more about Puritan life since Transcendentalism, explored in her previous book, was a strong reaction to that …

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Controversy wrapped in sentiment: Louisa May Alcott’s genius

(Disclaimer: Admittedly I've only just started pouring over Louisa's works, and I haven't yet ventured into her "blood and thunder" tales, so my comments here are limited to the later stage of her writing which proved to be the most successful). Louisa's genius I've often said that Louisa May Alcott's genius was twofold. She crafted …

Louisa May Alcott’s brand of feminism: final thoughts on “Moods,” thanks to Sarah Elbert

I finally finished reading Moods a few weeks ago but just couldn't comment on it. After reading both the 1864 and 1882 versions, I concluded that the book left me flat. The characters felt rather two-dimensional. Both versions ended differently and each ending seemed convoluted. It left me feeling the way I did after reading …