Fiction or non-fiction? How should I tell the story of Lizzie?

Note: Although I had promised a series of posts on women's health in the nineteenth century, I need to postpone those posts until I clear up a problem with citing an important source. Stay tuned! In the meantime, I thought I would share this with you. * * * * * * * * * …

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An announcement followed by a discovery

As you can see from the teasers I've been posting lately, there is a lot coming down the road! Much of it is coming from an announcement I'd like to make. The announcement Now that the major work for my two books is behind me, I am dedicating my efforts towards my book on Elizabeth …

“I Will Remember You:” a video and musical tribute to Louisa May Alcott and her sister Lizzie

I created this video in tribute to these two special ladies in our lives. In a previous post I had mentioned how Louisa and Lizzie had changed my life; thus I put together this song and video in tribute. Enjoy and spread it around! Are you passionate about Louisa May Alcott too? Subscribe to our …

For Moms and their ‘Little Women’

In honor of Mother's Day, I am delighted to present this guest post by Barbara Solomon Josselsohn,  reprinted with permission from NYMetroParents. A two-day trip to Concord, Massachusetts and the home of Louisa May Alcott, author of Little Women, is a great way to commemorate Mother’s Day—or any other time set aside just for the …

Coming to Concord this summer? Here’s some recommendations

I just created a page with personal recommendations of places to visit and things to do while visiting Concord, Massachusetts. The one thing I could not recommend is hotels because I live too close to Concord to have stayed overnight. Here's some recommendations for those of you who want to indulge in living history (to …

Take a tour of the final resting place of the Alcotts

There's a terrific article on the Concord Patch written by a licensed Concord tour guide, Harry Beyer. He takes you on a tour of the Alcott family plot at Sleepy Hollow cemetery. Here's a teaser from the article: Louisa May was an active abolitionist, helping to shelter runaway slaves on the Underground Railroad. She was also an early …