“Let Genius Burn,” a Louisa May Alcott podcast on her life and legacy, co-hosted by Jamie Burgess and Jill Fuller is here!

The wait is over. The long-awaited eight-part podcast miniseries by Alcott scholars Jamie Burgess and Jill Fuller debuted today, July 12. Judging from the first episode, it has been worth the wait! Jill and Jamie are affable and knowledgeable hosts. They aim to tell the story of Louisa's life through a series of "puzzle pieces" …

Lizzie Alcott’s story told in quilts

The Littlest Woman: The Life and Legacy of Lizzie Alcott, the Real Beth March

I saw this article on a quilting blog and thought you might find it interesting. I wish I knew more about quilts and the significance of their design but perhaps some of you can offer help in your comments.

Here is the article:

Hands All Around #5: Star Puzzle for Elizabeth Alcott

Block #5 Star Puzzle by Becky Brown

A block for Elizabeth (Peabody) Sewall Alcott, the quiet sister. The puzzle may be: “How could anyone be quiet in that family?”

 Elizabeth (Peabody) Sewall Alcott (1835-1858) 
Crayon (chalk) portrait by Caroline Negus Hildreth 1857
Collection of Orchard House

Continue reading: http://civilwarquilts.blogspot.com/2021/05/hands-all-around-5-star-puzzle-for.html

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BookTrib book review: “Beth and Amy” by Virginia Kantra

With Beth & Amy (Berkley), the sequel to the popular Meg & Jo, bestselling author Virginia Kantra delivers a gratifying page-turner about the other two sisters from the beloved Louisa May Alcott classic, Little Women: the one who dies and the one who is vilified. The happy occasion of Jo’s wedding to Eric Bhaer brings Beth back from Nashville and Amy from New York. …

An Alcott rag doll and embroidery by Abba Alcott, from the Fruitlands Museum Collection

I went to Fruitlands today with my sister to visit the art museum and happened across these interesting items: Rag doll presumably owned by the Alcott Daughters, ca. 1840This simple and well-loved doll made from rags was likely owned by the Alcott sisters. The wear of the fabric implies many hours of play.Fruitlands Museum Collection, …

Cast your vote NOW to put Louisa May Alcott’s image on a circulating coin!

From the Louisa May Alcott Society, posted by Aryssa Damron: I just nominated Louisa May Alcott as part of an initiative between the U.S. Mint and the National Women's History Museum to put prominent American Women on circulating coins!  It was announced today that Maya Angelou and Sally Ride will be some of the first …

First draft of Chapter 2 of Lizzie book completed!

The Littlest Woman: The Life and Legacy of Lizzie Alcott, the Real Beth March

I am pleased to announce that I have completed the first draft of chapter 2 which focuses on the Alcott family’s first home in Concord. This was a fun chapter to write as there was much to say about the sisters. There are a couple of revealing letters from Bronson to Lizzie plus reminiscences from Lizzie’s best friend and next-door neighbor at the time, Lydia Hosmer.

Concordia (aka Dove Cote) courtesy of the Louisa May Alcott Memorial Society

Now that I have finally figured out the methodology for writing this book (and that has taken years as I am teaching myself), the writing goes along much faster. And as I edit, I learn new things — how will I make this book read like a novel rather than just a regurgitating of facts? What words and methods will I use to make the reader feel Lizzie’s story? And how will…

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Still plenty of time to submit to “Alcott’s Hidden Critics: The Secret Reviews of Little Women”

Knowing how busy everyone is, we have developed an easier format for you to use when submitting your entries for the project "Alcott's Hidden Critics: The Secret Reviews of Little Women." Using the new Google Form allows you to upload your entry directly to us, without having to generate an email. You will need a …

“Discover Concord” features article on “Alcott’s Hidden Critics: The Secret Reviews of Little Women.”

The Spring 2021 issue of Discover Concord magazine features all the details of my current project with Lorraine Tosiello in unearthing and archiving personal references to Little Women in diaries, journals, school projects, blog posts, fan fiction, etc. Here is the link: Discover Concord Spring 2021 - see pages 56-57. We are accepting submissions now …

Exciting new project announcement, and we need your help to make it happen!

I am pleased to announce a partnership with independent Alcott scholar and author Lorraine Tosiello for a fantastic new project known as “Alcott’s Hidden Critics: The Secret Reviews of Little Women.” Through this unique and important undertaking, we seek to locate and collect reader responses to Little Women over its 150-year history and archive them …

Another stab at fiction – Father, sisters and childhood from Lizzie’s point of view

The Littlest Woman: The Life and Legacy of Lizzie Alcott, the Real Beth March

This is a series of scenes that I wrote for fun a few years ago. Sometimes I wish I didn’t work so slowly! I hope I stay healthy long enough to write a novel as well as a biography. I really love taking Lizzie’s point of view and seeing life as I imagine it through her eyes. But I can always write scenes. 🙂

This is the first draft.

Memories of Father

My first memory was of his face. It was a kind face with blue eyes like still pools, and I could see myself in them. Such a sweet countenance, one I could look at from morning till night. It broke into a smile, and a quiet voice spoke my name: “Elizabeth.” My arms shot up in an instant, hoping he would lift me.  He granted my wish, and as I snuggled close to his chest, he looked into…

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