Rewriting “A Christmas Carol” for children: “A Christmas Dream and How It Came True”

I came across an article on Scotsman.com about why we so often associate Charles Dickens with Christmas  (see The father of Christmas: What the festive season owes to Charles Dickens) and it really opened my eyes. The influence of Charles Dickens Despite that fact that I have read so little of Dickens, I could still …

This question needs your input . . .

I got a fantastic question from Jillian, a good friend of this blog regarding Bronson and Louisa. I'd love your input: If Bronson Alcott was a follower of Transcendentalism (self-reliance), why does he scold Louisa May for filling her journal with thoughts of self?   I have my theory but I'd like to hear yours …

What makes Orchard House such a compelling historical site?

Here's a great essay by Klara Stephanie Szlezák where she concludes that staging is critical to the success of an historical homestead. Kudos to Orchard House for the brilliance of its staging which so beautifully captures not just the era Louisa May Alcott lived in, but her home, her family and her classic, Little Women. …

Oops!

Off the track a bit to present day:  it appears an error was made regarding a quote which appears on the new rug in the Oval Office. The quote in question is, "The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.", and on the rug it was attributed to Dr. Martin …

“Amy” meets a fan

I loved this section that I read in Carolyn Ticknor's May Alcott A Memoir this morning. It details how May, while visiting the small village of Grez in France ( the latest mecca for artists), ran into a 14 year old fan of Little Women. Having read before how Louisa May Alcott was the first …

Here’s something fun to do with “The Lost Summer of Louisa May Alcott”

Just a quickie today, saw this on Kelly O'Connor McNees' Twitter page - a link to Oprah's summer reading section (kudos to McNees - well done on your first novel!). Might be interesting to answer some of these questions and post responses with your comments. Let's go for it - http://www.oprah.com/omagazine/The-Lost-Summer-of-Louisa-May-Alcott-Reading-Group-Guide I plan to write …

An Artist without the Temperament: How Rare!

In reading May's accounts of her travels and adventures, and hearing how other family members saw her, it occurs to me that May Alcott Nieriker is the first artist I've ever 'met' that didn't have the artist temperament. How do I know? I should know, I've been 'blessed' with one. 🙂 My art teacher in …

Day 3 May Alcott a Memoir – Opposites Attract

I get it now why Louisa became so close to her sister, May, and it's because they were opposites. An obvious thought to be sure, but Ticknor's memoir made that all the clearer to me. Louisa was complex, conflicted, duty bound, guilt-ridden . . . a rather typical 19th century New Englander from all appearances. …

Welcome!

I was looking for an excuse to create this blog after my latest reading 'binge' on Louisa May Alcott, someone whom I find endlessly fascinating.  That excuse came in the form of a challenge, the "All Things Alcott" challenge, where we are to pursue our love of anything related to Louisa May Alcott (be it …