Writing for magazines and websites (just as Louisa May Alcott did)

Wishing to have articles published in magazines and on websites, I did some research online. Magazine writing was, of course, Louisa May Alcott's bread and butter, even after her success with Little Women. After spending about an hour searching with Google, I found that there are many possibilities both in print publications and websites for …

Little Women Legacy: (Down) Under the Umbrella with Trix Wilkins, Featured Author

From Pink Umbrella Books: Having read “The Courtship of Jo March” by Trix Wilkins (and loved it), I was especially interested in her essay, “Why Jo Says No (and Why We Care),” and she nailed it! From “Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy.”

In this blog post series, we’ll feature contributing authors from our new anthology, Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy. Today we’ll catch up with Trix Wilkins, writer, Aussie, and Alcott enthusiast.

Trix

Contributor Trix Wilkins, photographed by her seven-year-old son, reads Little Women across from the iconic Sydney Opera House.


What is your favorite scene from Little Women?

I love the New Year’s Eve ball where Jo and Laurie officially meet. They have an interesting and free-flowing conversation, and of course that wonderful dance in the hallway that happens because Jo says she can’t show the burn in her dress and Laurie says let’s dance anyway. It’s a lot of fun. I think this is the first time in the novel we see Jo unburdened—no thoughts of money or war or work, just joyful moments—and being the person she might always be in the company of such a friend…

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Little Women Legacy Launch Giveaway

From Pink Umbrella Books: This is the best giveaway ever! Enter to win an original painting simply for buying “Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy.”

To celebrate the launch of Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy fine artist, Shalece Fiack, has donated an original painting to be given away to one lucky Alcott fan.  To enter:

  1. Follow PinkUmbrella Books and Shalece Fiack Studios on social media (one entry)
  2. Share or reblog this post (two entries)
  3. Purchase a copy of  Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy and send a copy of your receipt to pinkumbrellabooks@gmail.com (three entries) (previously purchased copies count, if you purchased at the Orchard House launch, you’re already entered, if you bought online, send us your receipt)

Giveaway ends October 8, 2018. Winner will be announced on our social media and will be notified via email. 10% of publisher proceeds go to Orchard House Museum to help preserve the Little Women legacy.

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Happy 150th Birthday Little Women!

Sunday September 30, 2018 will live in my memory for a long time. This day we celebrated the 150th birthday of Little Women by Louisa May Alcott.  The sparkling Autumn day was the backdrop for scores of Little Women fans -- young and old, men and women, and all the lovely activities making for quite …

Little Women Legacy: News from New Jersey with Lauren Cutrone, Featured Author

From Pink Umbrella Books: Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes contributor Lauren Cutrone’s essay, “Little Women, Feminism and a New Definition of Beauty” points out yet another reason this book can speak to girls today. And it was written at her Louisa May Alcott desk!

In this blog post series, we’ll feature contributing authors from our new anthology, Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy. Today we’ll catch up with Lauren Cutrone, writer, publishing professional, and Jersey girl.

cutrone

Lauren Cutrone reads Little Women in New Jersey.


What is your favorite scene from Little Women?

There is a very tiny, seemingly insignificant scene that always comes to me first. In Good Wives, there is a scene where Jo is stuck. She’s in Concord but finds that it’s no longer serving her. She wants to leave, but she has no idea where to go. This leads to Marmee helping Jo to make her way to New York City, but this scene of rare stillness for Jo always sticks out to me. This is such a pivotal moment where Jo decides who she is and who she wants to be. Whenever I feel “stuck,” I remember…

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Little Women Legacy: An Idaho Interlude with Marlowe Daly, Featured Author

From Pink Umbrella Books: contributor Marlowe Daly’s essay, “Literary Lessons” showed to me the heart of a teacher, one who loves both her students and her subject. And Little Women.

In this blog post series, we’ll feature contributing authors from our new anthology, Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy. Today we’ll catch up with Marlowe Daly, who teaches literature, writing, and humanities at Idaho’s Lewis-Clark State College.

Marlowe

Marlowe Daly reads Little Women at  the Spalding site of Nez Perce National Park near her home in Idaho. Photo by Anahi Galeano.


If the March sisters were employed where you work, what would their jobs be? 

Although Jo and Meg do some teaching, I can’t really picture either of them working at the college where I teach. I’m happy to say that my colleagues are deeply devoted to teaching and make great efforts to continually improve their pedagogy and practice. Meg and Jo, on the other hand, seem to lack a passion for teaching. Even later on, in Little Men and Jo’s Boys, Jo seems more interested in the duties that…

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Little Women Legacy: Alcott in the Big Apple with Lorraine Tosiello, Featured Author

From Pink Umbrella Books: interview with contributor Lorraine Tosiello; her essay is called “Piccole Donne” (Little Women in Italian). If you love Little Women, Louisa, the Beatles, Italian families and sisters, you will love this wonderful essay.

In this blog post series, we’ll feature contributing authors from our new anthology, Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy. Today we’ll catch up with Lorraine Tosiello, physician, writer, and lifelong Little Women aficionado.

TosielloContributor Lorraine Tosiello reads Little Women under the watchful eye of her “neighbor,” the Empire State Building.


What is your favorite scene from Little Women?

For me, there’s no scene in the book that comes anywhere near the betrothal scene “under the umbrella” between Jo and Professor Bhaer.  It is wise and sentimental, humorous and poignant, ridiculous and powerful all at once. Jo rushes downtown to find Friedrich, she finds him and he says he is leaving town, she stifles her emotions, he gets confused, they shop for everyone else but themselves, and she blubbers, “You are going away!” And then come my two favorite images in the whole book: Friedrich says that he…

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