Little Women Legacy: Alcott in the Big Apple with Lorraine Tosiello, Featured Author

From Pink Umbrella Books: interview with contributor Lorraine Tosiello; her essay is called “Piccole Donne” (Little Women in Italian). If you love Little Women, Louisa, the Beatles, Italian families and sisters, you will love this wonderful essay.

In this blog post series, we’ll feature contributing authors from our new anthology, Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy. Today we’ll catch up with Lorraine Tosiello, physician, writer, and lifelong Little Women aficionado.

TosielloContributor Lorraine Tosiello reads Little Women under the watchful eye of her “neighbor,” the Empire State Building.


What is your favorite scene from Little Women?

For me, there’s no scene in the book that comes anywhere near the betrothal scene “under the umbrella” between Jo and Professor Bhaer.  It is wise and sentimental, humorous and poignant, ridiculous and powerful all at once. Jo rushes downtown to find Friedrich, she finds him and he says he is leaving town, she stifles her emotions, he gets confused, they shop for everyone else but themselves, and she blubbers, “You are going away!” And then come my two favorite images in the whole book: Friedrich says that he…

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Little Women Legacy: Letters from Lake Superior with Deborah Davis Schlacks, Featured Author

From Pink Umbrella for Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: interview with contributor Deborah Davis Schlacks – her essay, “Pilgrim’s Regress” is powerful about finding the courage to speak up, and how the ability to write can send the message. She of course, cites Louisa as her inspiration.

In this blog post series, we’ll feature contributing authors from our new anthology, Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy. Today we’ll catch up with Deborah Davis Schlacks, recently retired Professor Emerita of English at the University of Wisconsin-Superior.

Schlacks.jpg

Contributor Deborah Davis Schlacks reading her Companion Library edition of Little Women at Fairlawn Mansion in Superior, Wisconsin.


What is your favorite scene from Little Women?

My favorite is the scene where it is revealed that Jo has cut off her hair and sold it to finance her mother’s trip to tend to her ailing father.  Jo’s willingness to sacrifice “her one beauty” to the sake of someone she loved was the first thing that impressed me about it way back when I first read Little Women.  And it is also so important that in giving up her long hair, she is making a decision not to let physical beauty—which is…

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Little Women Legacy: Sounding Off From Puget Sound with K.R. Karr, Featured Author

Meet another author from “Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy” – K.R. Karr, West Coast writer and academic – loved her essay on Goethe, her grandmother Oma, and the suitability of Professor Bhaer for Jo.

In this blog post series, we’ll feature contributing authors from our new anthology, Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy. Today we’ll catch up with K.R. Karr, West Coast writer and academic.

Karr

Contributor K.R. Karr on Puget Sound with the Washington State Ferry in the background. Photo credit: Kristina Berger.


What is your favorite scene from Little Women?

My favorite scene from Little Women is when Jo comes home with her hair cut, having sold it to pay for Marmee’s train ticket after Mr. March is wounded in battle. This scene really demonstrates to me Jo’s inner qualities, as well as her love for her family.

Who are some of your other “imaginary heroes” from literature?

I love this phrase “imaginary heroes” and some of mine include Emily of Deep Valley, Jane Eyre, Cassandra Mortmain of I Capture the Castle, Renee in Colette’s The Vagabond, Lucy Honeychurch…

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Little Women Legacy: Getting Bookish with Susan Bailey, Featured Author

Look who got featured on Pink Umbrella Books for “Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy”! Thank you Pink Umbrella Books for the honor and privilege of being featured in your new book.

In this blog post series, we’ll feature contributing authors from our new anthology, Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy. Today we’ll catch up with Susan Bailey, author, Louisa May Alcott devotee, and proud New Englander!

Bailey

Contributor Susan Bailey cozies up with The Annotated Little Women in Massachusetts.


What is your favorite scene from Little Women?

My favorite scene is when Beth runs over to thank Mr. Laurence, impulsively puts her arms around his neck and kisses him, and ends up sitting in his lap. I thought that took a lot of guts to do that! I am a typical Yankee (“frozen chosen” as they call us in New England) – quite reserved, especially when it comes to showing physical affection, and I know I would have been far too self-conscious to do what Beth did. She totally forgot herself in the spirit of love and gratitude towards…

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A Tale of Two Editors: the makings of The Little Women Legacy

A great interview by Trix Wilkins of the Much Ado about Little Women blog with Merry Gordon and Marnae Kelly of Pink Umbrella Books and their newest release, “Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy.”

Much ado about Little Women

I had to ask: Team Laurence or Team Bhaer? Editors Merry Gordon and Marnae Kelly talk Jo March’s ending, how they’d put the March sisters to work at Pink Umbrella Books (not just work of course – they’d go on holiday too), and surprises for fans in the to-be-released anthology, Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy.

Jo March’s ending – Jo with Friedrich Bhaer, Jo with Theodore Laurence, Jo single, or something else?

MERRY: I’m Team Friedrich. Unpopular opinion, perhaps, but Laurie is such a puppy.

MARNAE: I’m a big Bhaer fan because of the equality of minds in that relationship and the opportunities for growth in both characters.

Who of all the March sisters would you go on holiday with, where would you go, and why?

MERRY: I’d take an English holiday with Jo – specifically to hit up the literary landmarks, as we are kindred spirits that way.

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Come out on Sunday, Sept. 30th at Orchard House for the 150th Anniversary of Little Women! Book signing for “Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy”

It's coming up fast! In less than 2 months we will celebrate the anniversary of a classic; a book that has profoundly influenced women around the world since 1868. That book? Little Women of course! Louisa May Alcott's Orchard House is throwing a bash and you're invited - Sunday, September 30 from 1:30-4. Stay tuned …

Louisa May Alcott Illuminated by The Message only $5 till Christmas

Looking for a great gift for a Louisa lover in your life? How about yourself? My publisher, ACTA, has reduced the price of my book, Louisa May Alcott Illuminated by The Message from $10.95 to only $5 up until Christmas! Here's a sample that you can read. Click here to order your copy. And a …

Louisa May Alcott is My Passion: The Podcast! Episode Three: Louisa the runner, the real Beth’s piano, and more

"I always thought I must have been a deer or a horse in some former state, because it was such a joy to run." Louisa May Alcott, "Sketch of Childhood, by herself." Welcome to the third episode of Louisa May Alcott is My Passion: The Podcast! Welcome to the third episode of Louisa May Alcott …

Louisa May Alcott is My Passion: The Podcast! Episode Two: Wrap-up of the 2016 Summer Conversational Series

"It's amazing how lovely common things become, if one only knows how to look at them." (from "Marjorie's Three Gifts," 1877) Welcome to the second episode of Louisa May Alcott is My Passion: The Podcast! During the next thirty six minutes I will give you an overview of the recent Summer Conversational Series, "'Finding Beauty …

Louisa May Alcott is My Passion: The Podcast! Episode One: “Beauty in the humblest things”

Welcome to the premier episode of I will share your message on the July podcast! Your participation is so important. Topics and show notes: A reading Louisa May Alcott: Illuminated by The Message by Susan Bailey, pgs. 88-89, from Work: A Story of Experience * * * * * * * * * * * …

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