Call for papers from the Louisa May Alcott society

For those of you who feel inclined, I came across this announcement in my email today:

American Literature Association
23rd Annual Conference
May 24-27, 2012
San Francisco, CA

Call for Papers
Louisa May Alcott Society

After Alcott: Her Influence in the Work of Later Authors

As Elaine Showalter observes in her germinal essay, “Little Women: The American Female Myth,” writers as
esteemed and influential as Gertrude Stein, Adrienne Rich, and Cynthia Ozick have acknowledged a debt to
Alcott. References to and re-visionings of Alcott’s writing and life have appeared in the work of such authors
as Joyce Carol Oates, Barbara Kingsolver, Geraldine Brooks, Lynda Barry, and many others.

This session will seek to trace Alcott’s influence in the work of authors and artists who have come after, and
will consider how allusions to her work – fleeting or substantial – make meaning in these later settings.
Please send 200-300-word abstracts electronically to Mary Shelden at mlshelden@vcu.edu. The deadline for
proposals is Friday, January 20, 2012. Early submissions welcome.

Teaching Alcott in Survey and Seminar

More of Louisa May Alcott’s work is available for teaching than ever before: in the Heath Anthology of
American Literature, the Norton Anthology of Children’s Literature, the Norton Anthology of Literature by Women, the
Norton Critical Edition of Little Women – not to mention more recently published gothic works like A Long
Fatal Love-Chase and e-texts for works like An Old-Fashioned Girl. With all this Alcott at our fingertips, the
question suggests itself: how are we teaching Alcott’s work? How are we working Alcott into our literary
survey courses? Our women’s literature and women’s studies classes? Our American studies courses?

This Louisa May Alcott Society-sponsored session at the American Literature Association Conference (San
Francisco, May 24-27, 2012) seeks to consider Alcott in the context of our courses. How does examination of
Alcott alongside of Thoreau, or Whitman, or Dickinson, or Douglass change our understanding of her work?
How are we helping our students to make sense of Alcott’s biography in the larger context of history? What
are our successes and challenges in teaching Alcott?

Please send 200-300-word abstracts electronically to Mary Shelden at mlshelden@vcu.edu. The deadline for
proposals is Friday, January 20, 2012. Early submissions welcome.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s