“Discover Concord” features article on “Alcott’s Hidden Critics: The Secret Reviews of Little Women.”

The Spring 2021 issue of Discover Concord magazine features all the details of my current project with Lorraine Tosiello in unearthing and archiving personal references to Little Women in diaries, journals, school projects, blog posts, fan fiction, etc. Here is the link: Discover Concord Spring 2021 - see pages 56-57. We are accepting submissions now …

Exciting new project announcement, and we need your help to make it happen!

I am pleased to announce a partnership with independent Alcott scholar and author Lorraine Tosiello for a fantastic new project known as “Alcott’s Hidden Critics: The Secret Reviews of Little Women.” Through this unique and important undertaking, we seek to locate and collect reader responses to Little Women over its 150-year history and archive them …

Another stab at fiction – Father, sisters and childhood from Lizzie’s point of view

The Littlest Woman: The Life and Legacy of Lizzie Alcott, the Real Beth March

This is a series of scenes that I wrote for fun a few years ago. Sometimes I wish I didn’t work so slowly! I hope I stay healthy long enough to write a novel as well as a biography. I really love taking Lizzie’s point of view and seeing life as I imagine it through her eyes. But I can always write scenes. 🙂

This is the first draft.

Memories of Father

My first memory was of his face. It was a kind face with blue eyes like still pools, and I could see myself in them. Such a sweet countenance, one I could look at from morning till night. It broke into a smile, and a quiet voice spoke my name: “Elizabeth.” My arms shot up in an instant, hoping he would lift me.  He granted my wish, and as I snuggled close to his chest, he looked into…

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Lizzie as you have never seen her before

“The Orchard House” by Heidi Chiavaroli is a compelling read (review and Q and A with the author)

Two sisters, Taylor and Victoria, discover an old manuscript of poems tucked away behind a wall on the site of Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House in Concord, MA. The mysterious woman, who wrote the lines over 150 years ago, shared a strong connection with Alcott. The poet would never know the life-changing influence of her …

The contest is on! Try your hand at finishing Louisa May Alcott’s story and be featured in The Strand Magazine.

You may recall late last June that The Strand published an unfinished story written by then 17-year-old Louisa May Alcott uncovered at the Houghton Library. The story left us dangling! The contest is now on to finish the story! Looking for writers The managing editor of The Strand, Andrew Gulli, is inviting writers to finish …

A Worse Place than Hell: John Matteson’s Personally Guided Odyssey through the Civil War

  John Matteson did not win the Pulitzer Prize for his first book, Eden's Outcasts: The Story of Louisa May Alcott and her Father, simply because he wrote a good biography. At the time, Eden's Outcasts was an ambitious effort of a dual biography, exploring the lives of daughter and father while also analyzing their …

Book review: “A Worse Place than Hell” by John Matteson

The Lives of 5 Historical Figures Intersect in A Worse Place Than Hell A Worse Place Than Hell is a masterpiece, a must-read.  Find out more on my BookTrib.com review:     Are you passionate about Louisa May Alcott too? Subscribe to the email list and never miss a post! Keep up with news and free …

Bronson Alcott’s Fruitlands, as seen in Discover Concord Magazine

I invite you to read my latest article in the Winter edition of Discover Concord Magazine: https://discoverconcordma.com/winter-2020-issue             Are you passionate about Louisa May Alcott too? Subscribe to the email list and never miss a post! Keep up with news and free giveaways on Susan's books, Louisa May Alcott: Illuminated …

“Let Genius Burn,” a Louisa May Alcott podcast on her life and legacy coming in 2021, co-hosted by Jamie Burgess and Jill Fuller.

I am pleased to present this guest post by Jill Fuller and Jamie Burgess. Early April, sunrise. The tree branches are still black against creamy pink sunlight, and I am at my kitchen table surrounded by a stack of books, my laptop, and a mug of coffee. It is our fifth week of lockdown, and …