Little Women Legacy Launch Giveaway

From Pink Umbrella Books: This is the best giveaway ever! Enter to win an original painting simply for buying “Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy.”

To celebrate the launch of Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy fine artist, Shalece Fiack, has donated an original painting to be given away to one lucky Alcott fan.  To enter:

  1. Follow PinkUmbrella Books and Shalece Fiack Studios on social media (one entry)
  2. Share or reblog this post (two entries)
  3. Purchase a copy of  Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy and send a copy of your receipt to pinkumbrellabooks@gmail.com (three entries) (previously purchased copies count, if you purchased at the Orchard House launch, you’re already entered, if you bought online, send us your receipt)

Giveaway ends October 8, 2018. Winner will be announced on our social media and will be notified via email. 10% of publisher proceeds go to Orchard House Museum to help preserve the Little Women legacy.

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Happy 150th Birthday Little Women!

Sunday September 30, 2018 will live in my memory for a long time. This day we celebrated the 150th birthday of Little Women by Louisa May Alcott.  The sparkling Autumn day was the backdrop for scores of Little Women fans -- young and old, men and women, and all the lovely activities making for quite …

Little Women Legacy: News from New Jersey with Lauren Cutrone, Featured Author

From Pink Umbrella Books: Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes contributor Lauren Cutrone’s essay, “Little Women, Feminism and a New Definition of Beauty” points out yet another reason this book can speak to girls today. And it was written at her Louisa May Alcott desk!

In this blog post series, we’ll feature contributing authors from our new anthology, Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy. Today we’ll catch up with Lauren Cutrone, writer, publishing professional, and Jersey girl.

cutrone

Lauren Cutrone reads Little Women in New Jersey.


What is your favorite scene from Little Women?

There is a very tiny, seemingly insignificant scene that always comes to me first. In Good Wives, there is a scene where Jo is stuck. She’s in Concord but finds that it’s no longer serving her. She wants to leave, but she has no idea where to go. This leads to Marmee helping Jo to make her way to New York City, but this scene of rare stillness for Jo always sticks out to me. This is such a pivotal moment where Jo decides who she is and who she wants to be. Whenever I feel “stuck,” I remember…

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Chapter X. The P. C. and P. O.

from LW150 – The P.C. and the P.O

Little Women 150

By Lorinda B. Cohoon

“The P. C. and P. O.” chapter recounts a deepening of the friendship between the March family and the Laurence family through Laurie’s admission to the secret society of the Pickwick Club. Both Meg and Amy have reservations about admitting a boy to the club–Mr. Winkle reminds the club members that “[t]his is a ladies’ club, and we wish to be private and proper” (90). Despite these objections, Laurie is voted in as “Sam Weller” once Jo, as Mr. Snodgrass, draws attention to all the ways the members of the Pickwick Club have benefited from the Laurences’ wealth and position: “We can do so little for him, and he does so much for us, I think the best we can do is to offer him a place here, and make him welcome, if he comes” (90). The martin house post office Laurie provides becomes the site…

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Little Women Legacy: An Idaho Interlude with Marlowe Daly, Featured Author

From Pink Umbrella Books: contributor Marlowe Daly’s essay, “Literary Lessons” showed to me the heart of a teacher, one who loves both her students and her subject. And Little Women.

In this blog post series, we’ll feature contributing authors from our new anthology, Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy. Today we’ll catch up with Marlowe Daly, who teaches literature, writing, and humanities at Idaho’s Lewis-Clark State College.

Marlowe

Marlowe Daly reads Little Women at  the Spalding site of Nez Perce National Park near her home in Idaho. Photo by Anahi Galeano.


If the March sisters were employed where you work, what would their jobs be? 

Although Jo and Meg do some teaching, I can’t really picture either of them working at the college where I teach. I’m happy to say that my colleagues are deeply devoted to teaching and make great efforts to continually improve their pedagogy and practice. Meg and Jo, on the other hand, seem to lack a passion for teaching. Even later on, in Little Men and Jo’s Boys, Jo seems more interested in the duties that…

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Hitting the Mark: A review of “Little Women” (a modern retelling) starring Lea Thompson

The newest addition to the Little Women movie library is a modern adaptation, bringing the classic story by Louisa May Alcott into the 21st century. Directed by Clare Niederpruem and starring Lea Thompson as Marmee and Sarah Davenport as Jo, “Little Women” is a mixed bag that ultimately hits its mark. There are many liberties …

Little Women Legacy: All Smiles from Silicon Valley with KL Allendoerfer, Featured Author

From Pink Umbrella Books: KL Allendoerfer offers some fascinating insight; and as one introvert to another (and a Beth fan), her essay in Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes presented wonderful reasons to pay attention to the kitten-loving girl with the beat-up dolls.

In this blog post series, we’ll feature contributing authors from our new anthology, Alcott’s Imaginary Heroes: The Little Women Legacy. Today we’ll catch up with KL Allendoerfer, California-based writer, science educator, and musician.

Allendoerfer

Contributor KL Allendoerfer reads Little Women with “Pie,” the ubiquitous green droid in front of Silicon Valley’s Googleplex.


What is your favorite scene from Little Women?

It would be easy to say my favorite scene is the one I wrote about in my essay, in which Beth thanks Mr. Lawrence for the use of his piano and they become friends. I do love that scene, but there are so many others as well. I think the one that most got under my skin, and that I remembered many years later, was Jo’s disaster of a dinner party when Marmee decides to let the girls run things themselves. It shows Louisa has a wonderful sense of…

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