A Puritan Hero

Here’s one of those fascinating stories about Orchard House to be featured in the upcoming documentary by someone who should know (pssst! 5 days to go on the Kickstarter campaign – help Orchard House meet its goal: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/632439913/orchard-house
Amy’s book, Flight of the Sparrow is wonderful (see previous post); be sure and pick it up on Amazon.com.

Collisions

Orchard House snowAbout a decade ago, I worked for a few years at the Orchard House Museum in Concord, Massachusetts.  Best known as the home of Louisa May Alcott and the place where she wrote the classic novel, Little Women, the house has an impressive history of its own.  When I was there the 300-year-old building, renovated by Bronson Alcott in the 1850’s, was in the midst of a massive preservation project, so I had the opportunity to see, up-close, some of the details of the colonial construction.  Ever since, I’ve been fascinated not just by how historical houses are decorated, but how they’re constructed.

At that time, I was finishing work on my novel, Mr. Emerson’s Wife, about the Transcendental circle in19th century Concord.  Little did I know that a few years later, I’d encounter the house again, as I researched a 17th-century Concord lawyer for my new novel,

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