On the journey to harmony–Thoreau, the Sound Map and opening up the inner eye

I recently tried a couple of the exercises in Corinne Hosfeld Smith’s book, Henry David Thoreau for Kids–“Record Wild Animal Behavior” and “Draw a Sound Map.” It was a wonderful time outdoors and I was surprised how much I heard! Here’s my Sound Map:

panoramic photo (uses first and third photo)2-720

I wrote more about this on my other blog (Be as One) – you can read it here: On the journey to harmony–Thoreau, the Sound Map and opening up the inner eye — Be as One

You can read my review of Henry David Thoreau for Kids and get to know Corinne in this fascinating interview.

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Book Review: Henry David Thoreau for Kids: His Life and Ideas with 21 Activities by Corinne Hosfeld Smith

Henry David Thoreau for Kids is geared towards children ages nine and up but I am going to review this book as one for adults as well.

thoreau for kids

Abridged version of Thoreau

Cutting right to the chase—I loved this book. As a perpetual student of Louisa May Alcott and as someone who appreciates nature, I have been fascinated with Henry David Thoreau since childhood. I do find his writing however to be difficult to plough through at times as it is very dense; Thoreau’s works demand complete attention from the reader and this can be hard to sustain at times. Therefore I look upon Corinne Hosfeld Smith’s book to be a welcomed abridged version of Thoreau.

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Wayside, and Thoreau, as you’ve never seen them before; and some news

I came across two fascinating blog posts today that shed a new light on cherished Alcott/Concord lore.

Walden's Shore Henry David Thoreau and Nineteenth-Century ScienceThoreau and rocks

First of all, the Thoreau Society is running an interview with author Robert M. Thorson where he reveals something entire new about Thoreau.. It was discovered during his research for his book, Walden’s Shore: Henry David Thoreau and Nineteenth-Century Science about Thoreau, the self-taught physical scientist.

robert-thorson-150x150

Robert M. Thorson

Check out his discovery here.

Wayside or Orchard House?

Little Women‘s numerous readers know that Orchard House is the physical setting for the story of the March sisters. But do they know that next-door Wayside is where the action actually took place? (I know you do!)

Artist Joyce Pyka has been painting a folk art version of The Wayside, visualizing it as the home of the March sisters. She has a delightful blog post showing the progress of her work plus drawings of each sister. Remarking on Louisa May Alcott’s  extensive knowledgeable about flowers, she discusses those preferred by each sister and depicts them in the painting.

Here is how the painting appears so far:

Be sure and visit her blogpost to see a larger version of the painting and read about her progress. The drawings of the sisters are adorable!

Prints will be available when the painting is completed. It will be made available at http://pyka-joyce.artistwebsites.com/galleries.html  under her Folk Art Gallery.

News and Upcoming Posts

I am thisclose to finishing my first book and will be submitting it to the publisher around December 1. I will finally have some free time! I thank you for your patience with the scarcity of posts.

rose in bloomI wanted to announce that I am currently reading Rose in Bloom, have written my first post, and will begin posting as I get further into the book. I want to makes sure I post on a regular basis on this book since in the past I haven’t always been so faithful. I am very much enjoying Rose in Bloom so far and look forward to discussing it with you all.

 

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Book alert: Pilgrimage by Annie Leibovitz and Doris Kearns Goodwin

I just got a glimpse of Annie Leiborvitz’ new book, Pilgrimage and it is amazing! For those who don’t know, Pilgrimage is a journey through the places that mean the most to Leibovitz. One of those places is Concord where she toured Orchard House, Emerson’s home (Bush) and Walden Pond.

The pictures from Orchard House were AMAZING! Leibovitz went deep into the treasures of Orchard House to produce a stunning picture of May’s room with the sketches on the wall, Bronson’s journal with his hand and Louisa’s hand traced on the page, and a picture of 3 dolls, one made by Lizzie with the face painted by May. Leibovitz also showed a handkerchief that Louisa embroidered with her initials, the desk where she wrote Little Women and a collection of photos of people she admired (some famous).

I also was taken in by the photo of the original setting of Thoreau’s cabin with the stones. Apparently Bronson Alcott was the first to set stones in the setting to mark where the cabin had been.

I’m already a big fan of Doris Kearns Goodwin so I look forward to her commentary.

I nearly bought the book on the spot but knew we had to Christmas shop instead. However, I have ordered it on Amazon (where it is a lot cheaper :-)).

Get down to your favorite bookstore and check out Pilgrimage – it’s a coffee table book that will never leave your coffee table.


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Tapping into my inner Thoreau; play-acting as Sylvia Yule

It’s vacation time again with more opportunities to visit Concord. The more times I visit, the more I want to see.

A trip down the Sudbury River to Great Meadows

Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

I enjoy kayaking very much and so took a trip down the Sudbury River, launching from the bridge off of Lowell Road, just off of Concord center. My plan was to paddle to the Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, a prime place to go birdwatching. I used to go there as a child with my parents to watch birds, and in later years, traveled with the bird group from our parish, led by our parish priest! He was a true birder, visiting Plum Island on the North Shore of Massachusetts in March – great time to see ducks and shore birds, but the weather can be most inhospitable! Only the serious birder goes there. 🙂

Introducing the “Sylvia Yule”

The “Sylvia Yule” begins its trip on the Sudbury River in Concord

I bought my own kayak this summer so that I could get out more and decided to christen it the “Sylvia Yule.” The chapters in Moods that Louisa May Alcott devoted to the boat/camping trip of Sylvia, Adam, Geoffrey and her brother Max (and where Adam and Geoffrey both fell in love with Sylvia) described to perfection what it is like to paddle a boat on a river like the Sudbury. The kayak appeals to me because it places you so close to the water. I feel like I am one with the water.

Practicing Thoreau’s methods

Needless to say, Thoreau too was very much on my mind. His discourse in his “Walking” essay, about becoming one with nature and allowing it to penetrate your inner being certainly was a reality during this trip.

Sites of interest along the way

About to pass under the Old North Bridge, site of the first battle of the American Revolution

As an extra treat, I was able to travel under the Old North Bridge, the place where the first battle of the American Revolution took place. I was also able to dock and take a tour of Minuteman National Park. The Old Manse was conveniently next door and I got to see it too. Nathaniel Hawthorne and his new bride Sophia Peabody lived there for a time and legend has it they proclaimed their love for each other by carving their initials into the glass of a window with her diamond ring.

I hope you enjoy the slide show I’ve assembled of my tour of the Sudbury in beautiful Concord.

p.s. if any of you know flowers, I’d love if you could identify the flowers I photographed at Great Meadows. I’m sure they’re quite common but my knowledge of flowers is pitiful. 🙂

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Coming to Concord this summer? Here’s some recommendations

The Wayside, home to Nathaniel Hawthorne and the Alcotts

I just created a page with personal recommendations of places to visit and things to do while visiting Concord, Massachusetts. The one thing I could not recommend is hotels because I live too close to Concord to have stayed overnight.

Here’s some recommendations for those of you who want to indulge in living history (to me, that’s fun :-)):

Come Visit Concord . . .

Was Thoreau a romantic? Final thoughts on “Walking”

Much has been said about how unconventional Henry David Thoreau was. Although brilliant he was solitary, decidedly different, very blunt, not especially attractive physically, and he was prone to “queer” habits such as climbing trees, imitating bird calls and the like.

Yet women did find Thoreau attractive. Louisa May Alcott had a schoolgirl crush on him, and based characters in her books on him, most especially Adam Warwick, her doomed lover in Moods, and David Sterling in Work: A Story of Experience.

Sophia Foord, a naturalist and boarder at Hillside, the Alcott family home during Louisa’s teenage (and happiest) years, actually proposed marriage to a horrified Thoreau who brushed her aside.

Except for a failed attempt at love with Ellen Sewall (where he competed with his brother John for her affections), and a possible romantic interest in Lidian Emerson, Thoreau was not a ladies’ man. But I do maintain that he was a romantic.

Thoreau wrote passionately in his essay,  “Walking,” about traveling west, commenting that he usually positioned his feet west to south-west because “The future lies that way to me, and the earth seems more unexhausted and richer on that side.” He adds, “We go eastward to realize history, and study the works of art and literature, retracing the steps of the race, — we go westward as into the future, with a spirit of enterprise and adventure.” While Thoreau protested the idea of Manifest Destiny (the 19th century American belief that the United States was destined to expand across the North American continent, from the Atlantic Seaboard to the Pacific Ocean – Wikipedia) especially because of the Mexican-American War (which annexed Texas and permitted another slave state), it does seem that at least philosophically, he embraced the idea of heading west. And here’s where the romantic in him showed its face:

Every sunset which I witness inspires me with the desire to go to a west as distant and as fair as that into which the Sun goes down. He appears to migrate westward daily and tempt us to follow him. He is the Great Western Pioneer whom the nations follow. We dream all night of those mountain ridges in the horizon, though they may be of vapor only, which were last gilded by his rays. The island of Atlantis,and the islands and gardens of the Hesperides, a sort of terrestrial paradise, appear to have been the Great West of the ancients, enveloped in mystery and poetry. Who has not seen in imagination, when looking into the sunset sky, the gardens of the Hesperides, and the foundation of all those fables?

Not to be a killjoy, but what about all the hardships pioneers faced going out west? Many many thousands of people died from disease, starvation and battles with Native Americans. It was a tremendous struggle just to survive. I was surprised  in the romanticism and naivety that Thoreau seemed to exhibit but I was glad to see that he had such an optimistic spirit. He cites Sir Francis Head, an English traveler:

 “The heavens of America appear infinitely higher — the sky is bluer — the air is fresher — the cold is intenser — the moon looks larger — the stars are brighter — the thunder is louder — the lightning is vivider — the wind is stronger — the rain is heavier — the mountains are higher — the rivers larger — the forests bigger — the plains broader.”

This line made me laugh:

” . . .  the traveller can lie down in the woods at night almost anywhere in North America without fear of wild beasts.”

Um, ever hear of black bears?? Or bobcats??

It got me to thinking about the experiment at Walden. I still think it was a noble experiment but isn’t it true that he brought his laundry to his mother at the family homestead in Concord? 🙂

I know that going west for Thoreau was as much about allegory as it was about actually traveling there. The east represented the Old World and Old World (e.g. old ideas and narrow-minded and conventional) thinking whereas the west represented a broadening of one’s horizon and the possibility of reconnecting again with Nature – Sir Francis said it perfectly.

What’s the point of all this? Just that Thoreau was many things: brilliant thinker and writer, transcendentalist, abolitionist and government protester (and willing to go to jail over it), surveyor, pencil maker, innovator, naturalist – a man who said much and truly walked the walk. I would just like to add that he was also a romantic. Bombastic at times, but definitely a romantic.