Eight Cousins: “Tomboys make strong women”

Chapter 14 in Eight Cousins, "A Happy Birthday" lays out Uncle Alec's strategy for Rose's upbringing: she is to run, jump, climb trees and play with her cousins, and she is to ride horses, all in an attempt to strengthen her physical and emotional health. Mrs. Jessie compares the Rose she sees now with the …

Eight Cousins: Educating Rose

Uncle Alec affected big changes in Rose’s life as chapters 7 and 8 of Eight Cousins demonstrate.Joy lackingEarly in the book, there were several reasons why Rose was a timid, teary child (the untimely death of her dear father, too many “cooks in the kitchen” with all her aunts, etc.). Much of the joy had been …

Eight Cousins: health and welfare – what should women do for beauty?

Just a quickie today from Eight Cousins, chapter 5, "A Belt and a Box." First, the Belt Uncle Alec jumped right in with regards to Rose's health and welfare by suggesting that she take a run. He noticed her panting and suggested she loosen her belt so that she could breathe more deeply. It turned …

Eight Cousins: the value of fatherhood

Greetings to the Poet's Corner Virtual Book Club: Eight Cousins Eight Cousins (or The Aunt-Hill) introduces us to a new kind of heroine from Louisa May Alcott. Rose, blond and blue-eyed, comes from wealth. In past stories, it’s been the wealthy girls who have proven to be the antagonists (Sallie Moffat from Little Women, Fanny …