Podcast interview with Wini Moranville, author of “The Little Women Cookbook: Tempting Recipes from the March Sisters and Their Friends and Family”

I recently spoke with food writer Wini Moranville about her cookbook and the role of food in Little Women. It was a fascinating discussion which I am sharing with you as a podcast.   Also available on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3sCDGhWnBM The article referred to in the podcast is "Strawberries and Salt: Culinary Hazards and Moral Education …

Book review: Treat yourself to these delicious Little Women cookbooks

First, a disclaimer: I am no cook. And my diet regimen does not permit a lot of these foods (unfortunately). However, as someone who loves to eat, I did find the recipes in both of these books to be very tempting; I was quite hungry by the time I finished going through them. For devotees …

Book Review: March Sisters: On Life, Death, and Little Women

Recently a small book of essays titled March Sisters: On Life, Death, and Little Women was released, written by prominent female authors. There are four essays in all, each dedicated to a March sister. Written in a memoir format, each writer reflects upon a sister using her own life experiences for comparison and backdrop. From …

Greta Gerwig’s Little Women: Will Amy March finally catch a break?

Smithsonian.com thinks so. Writer Erin Blakemore presents her hopes that Greta Gerwig's adaptation of Little Women will finally present a well-rounded and fair portrayal of the most maligned of the March sisters by borrowing from the rich life of May Alcott Nieriker. The New ‘Little Women’ May Finally Do Justice to Its Most Controversial Character …

A first look at the Greta Gerwig adaptation of “Little Women,” coming out in Christmas 2019

Great article with lots of pictures. I think the movie looks promising but I remain cautious after the Masterpiece version. What do you think? Exclusive First Look: Greta Gerwig and Saoirse Ronan’s Little Women from Vanity Fair

“Let the World Know You Are Alive”: May Alcott Nieriker and Louisa May Alcott Confront Nineteenth-Century Ideas about Women’s Genius

I am pleased to share with you a wonderful essay about the professional lives of Louisa  May Alcott and May Alcott Nieriker written by Lauren Hehmeyer, a professor of History and English at Texarkana College. Professor Hehmeyer presented at the May Alcott conference in Paris in June of 2018 (see previous post) and is currently …

XX. Confidential

From the LW150 blog: What a wonderful post by NY Times best-selling author of the Penderwick family novels Jeanne Birdsall!

Little Women 150

By Jeanne Birdsall

Louisa settled at her desk, preparing to slog through another chapter of Little Women, this book she was writing only for the money. It was meant to be read by girls, which meant she needed to stay away from high drama and thunder, her usual ways to advance a story. She rubbed her temples—a headache threatened—unwittingly mussing her hair. Who was she to write for girls? A woman who’d never been a conventional girl, who barely knew what such girls talked about and wished for.

Stop fussing, she told herself, and get to work. Where was she in the story? The mother of the March family, Marmee, had just rushed home from Washington, where she’d been nursing the girls’ father, to find that Beth had miraculously escaped death from scarlet fever. The chapter needed to begin with quiet joy and gratitude. Louisa picked up her pen…

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