At a crossroads – here’s where you come in

I need your help. I'm stuck. I can't figure where next to take this blog and I could use your suggestions. Which direction should this blog go next? What road do you want this blog to take? source  “(C) by http://www.martin-liebermann.de” What are you eager to learn more about? Post your suggestions and I will consider …

The art of conversation, Bronson-style

Through his illustrious life, Bronson Alcott used many means to preach and teach his unique message of transcendentalism. In the early part of his career he used his gifts as a teacher to educate the young through the art of conversation (see previous post). As he believed the Divine resided in each child, he sought …

What were Bronson Alcott’s educational reforms? Here’s a simpler approach

From time to time I have posted about Bronson Alcott, mainly from my reading of Eden’s Outcasts: The Story of Louisa May Alcott and Her Father by John Matteson. I had been wanting to find a simpler explanation of Bronson's educational reforms; they were considered quite radical in his day but over time became incorporated …

Intimate letters

Well, I haven't finished it yet but I wanted to share the second anecdotal volume I got from the Worcester Public Library, Little Women Letters from the House of Alcott by Jessie Bonstelle and Marian De Forest, published in 1914. Origin of the book - inspired by Jo Both women felt compelled to compile this …

Getting to know the Alcotts through neighbors and friends

Between my trip to the Worcester library and the new Nook, I have been buried! Tons of reading all at once (which means tons of notetaking, and tons of fun!).  As I come up for air, I wanted to share with you some new rather old books I found. A treasure trove from the library …

Follow-up to search for Alcott family members

I got a response to my question about the search for current Alcott family members from someone in my Louisa May Alcott Facebook group. She writes; ... I read here in the Acknowledgments of Invincible Louisa by Cornelia Meigs that here's some folks you may want to look up: "For material in this biography, thanks …