Where are the current relatives of the Alcott Family?

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Reading about May and Louisa’s European tour in 1870-71 in Caroline Ticknor’s book, May Alcott A Memoir reminds me again of how strong the creative life force was in that family. There was such a sense of adventure in those two women, expressed through colorful stories and informative sketches and drawings. Was such talent and energy limited to just Louisa’s immediate family? Does anyone have information they could provide about Anna Bronson Alcott Pratt’s children? Did May’s daughter, Lulu Nieriker, have any children? Are any relations still living in Concord? Leave me a comment and let me know.

p.s. a curious find (probably only curious to me!) – in doing a preliminary search for current relatives, I found that my own family name figured in! My maiden name is Hoyle and I saw this in a list of family correspondences to be found at the Concord Library –

BRONSON ALCOTT PRATT [as recipient] (1 item):

ALS, Carrie M. Hoyle “To Mr. Alcott Pratt,” 1912 May 17 (invitation from Hoyle as Secretary of Louisa May Alcott Memorial Association to opening of the Alcott House).

Makes me want to find out who this Carrie M. Hoyle is. It appears the apple hasn’t fallen too far from the tree. 🙂

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6 Replies to “Where are the current relatives of the Alcott Family?”

  1. That you may have a family connection to the Alcotts is exciting. I hope you are able to trace down that lead. I’ve heard there are many good on-line sources for genealogical searches that you might consider going that route.

    I’m afraid I have no information to add to the question you raise about descendants of the Alcott family. After reading The Lost Summer of Louisa May Alcott I became curious about May as well as Louisa. They appeared to have had a very strong bond.

    I’ll keep watching this space to see what responses you get to the question. Here’s hoping for lots of good answers.

  2. Carrie M. Hoyle was a Concord resident and the first Secretary of the Louisa May Alcott Memorial Association — but unfortunately no relation of the Alcotts. The “LMAMA” was founded in 1911 to preserve and promote the Alcott’s Concord home, Orchard House. On May 27, 1912, the Association hosted a formal opening celebration of Orchard House (it had been renovated for about a year prior, and was shown haphazardly as the work was being done to it). Among the many invited guests were descendants of the Alcott family and many other Concord notables who had been friends of the family. Miss Hoyle was in charge of sending out the invites and collecting responses. Over 200 people came to the event, many sharing reminiscences of life and times in the Alcott home. Orchard House will actually begin a celebration of its Centennial starting in April of this year, and will culminate in a weekend full of special events on May 26-27, 2012!

    As far as the direct descendants of the Alcotts: Anna Alcott Pratt’s descendants still live in the New England area and one family does live in Concord and Acton, MA, while May had one daughter whose descendants all continue to reside in Europe. (None of their surnames as Alcott, however.) Although highly fulfilled in their given callings and proud of their heritage, none of the descendants became as famous as the Alcotts of Orchard House.

    1. Thank you so much for this information. I am very curious about Carrie Hoyle since Hoyle is my maiden name; now I really want to find out if there is a relation. It’s so cool that a namesake of mine was the first secretary of the LMAMA. 🙂

      I saw that about the centennial at the Orchard House website – reminds me that I should do a formal post about that.

    1. Oh yes, I just found that out this spring because of the Concord Players’ production of Little Women, when I saw one of the relatives listed in the program. Very cool!

  3. My grandmother’s maiden name was Jeanette Alcott. Her father’s name was Nathan Alcott. I was told that Louisa May Alcott was a relative. My grandmother’s family was from Saratoga, NY. I have started working on our family tree as my daughter has type 1 (juvenile) Diabetes. Since type 1 is genetic, her endocrinologist asked if we had any other relatives diagnosed. Up until 100 years ago, it was called ‘wasting away illness’. Type 1 is typically triggered by an illness. When the body fights the illness this genetic ‘flaw’ turns on and then starts killing the beta cells that make insulin. Elizabeth’s Scarlet Fever then getting ‘wasting away illness’ would fit a type 1 diagnosis. I contacted the Orchard House and am waiting to hear back from the person that works on the genealogy. Hoping to hear back soon!!

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