Meet today’s version of Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy from “The March Family Letters”

In part two of my behind-the-scenes look at “The March Family Letters,” we meet the March Sisters through a series of questions I posed to them:

meg marchMeg

What is your line of work?
As well as working towards a bachelor’s in engineering, I supplement my income by tutoring lower years.

Would you consider yourself to be excessively busy?
Incredibly. But it will be worth it in the end.

How long did you have to pin your hair back to cover up Jo’s mistake? I’m amazed you loaned her your dress after that debacle!
I had to hide my hair for weeks. It was very inconvenient.

And I am amazed at myself too; I don’t know what I was thinking. But it worked out because Jo managed to return the dress to me in a surprisingly flawless condition.

Finally, what is your view regarding and career, marriage and children? How do you intend to juggle/balance all of these?
I believe it is possible to have it all. I intend to work hard at my career to earn enough so I may be financially stable and can enjoy the finer things in life. I will marry an independently wealthy husband and between the two of us, I will be able to settle down comfortably and raise our children.

jo marchJo

What is your true ambition?
I want to be able to use what I love to not only support my family, but also to make a difference. The last thing I want is to be stuck doing something with my life that I’m not completely passionate about.

Have you ever been in love and if so, with whom?
I have dated in the past, but saying I was ever in love would be a huge overstatement.

Do you see yourself falling in love?
I mean, it’s possible that I might in the future, but it’s really not something I can picture happening to me at this point.

Do you have hopes of being famous someday?
Being famous isn’t a goal of mine, but I hope that one day my films will make a meaningful impact.

How do you feel about marriage and motherhood, and do you see it as a part of your future? How will you feel if one of your sisters marries first?
Marriage and motherhood are all well and good for some people (and no disrespect to those who choose that path), but I don’t really think it’s for me. I admire my mother and father immensely for all the work and love they put into raising us, but I don’t have a desire to do it myself. It definitely wouldn’t bother me if one of my sisters were to marry first, but I would want them to wait until they’ve had time to experience life as their own person separate from a relationship.

beth marchBeth

How do you feel around family and friends?
I love my family very much so of course being around my family then makes me happy. They have a way of making me feel like everything will be okay as long as we have each other.

Do you daydream?
When I listen to music I often get lost in the story the music creates for me.

How does music speak to you, and does it speak for you sometimes?
A lot of the time music does speak for me. It is my way of expressing the things I don’t know how to say with just words. One of the most amazing things about music is the way it connects people. The fact the same lyrics can mean so many different things to so many different people, and yet it brings those people together is one of the many things that makes music so beautiful.

amy marchAmy

Do you hope to become a successful artist, one who can make her living by creating and selling her art?
I do indeed have aspirations of being a successful artist, for I fear that keeping my talents to myself would be a terribly selfish thing to do. I think the world is in need of a fresh perspective and a powerful young female artist, and I am here to provide.

What art medium are you most talented at?
I prefer drawing in ink-based tools as to properly master them you must be quite sure of your talents and your instincts. And I believe that is what is best captured by my work, an instinctive confidence in the undiscovered and the imperfections of aesthetics.

Does your art have any particular message?
I try to most dubiously depict the supernatural in order to create a commentary on our society’s absurd beauty standards, and its phobia of aberrate social constructs. The mere concept of “social norms” irritates me to my core, as I believe we are all but visitors on this planet, and thus we cannot conceivably adhere to arbitrary rules made up by years of bias and misinformed history. I am appalled that my sisters and I will face challenges and discrimination as persons whom would fall under the category of “non-traditional” identities, because I think each of us offer our own unique beauty and talent to the world.

Are you drawn to the bohemian life?
I cannot say that I am, though I will recognize the challenge the ideology presents.

Where do you see yourself in five years?
I see myself at the prestigious École des Beaux-Arts in Paris and at the top of my class, perhaps while doing a fellowship.

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Update on Wayside/Little Women artist depiction by Joyce Pyka

Joyce Pyka, the artist depicting The Wayside in the context of Little Women (see previous post), has posted an update for her painting — check out the interesting new details she has added:

detail laurie

dog

Here is the painting with these sketches:

painting as of dec 2014

Check out her website for all the details.

Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard house to Launch Kickstarter Campaign in September for Documentary Film

From the official press release:

(Concord, MA) This fall will be a busy one in Concord at Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House. Orchard House is most noted for being home to the talented Alcott family, and as the place where Louisa May Alcott wrote andset her beloved classic novel, Little Women. But, the house is also rich in history dating all the way back to the 1600’s. To enhance their mission of sharing this history, the house is embarking on a documentary film project.

To fund this project Orchard House hopes to raise at least $150,000 by running a Kickstarter
funding campaign, which officially launches on September 17th.

Watch a preview video here: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/632439913/orchard-house/widget/video.html
KickstarterBanner-1 560

Tremendous legacy

Orchard House is one of the oldest, most authentically-preserved historic house museums in America, and brings the Alcott legacy in the fields of literature, art, education, philosophy, and social justice to life every day.

Unique tour experience

Named Best Literary House in New England by Yankee Magazine this June, Orchard House offers highly acclaimed tours, unique living history events, curriculum-based educational programs, and irreplaceable original family furnishings and archives. Annually, more than 50,000 visitors from all walks of life and every corner of the globe experience Orchard House — and discover what it means to be ‘home’.

24-orchard house

A chance to share stories

“We’re so delighted to begin this project” says executive director Jan Turnquist, “there are many stories to be told about Orchard House. While we won’t have the time to tell all of them, the documentary will certainly be a positive tool for us to share many of them and to engage generations of supports – old and new – from around the world.”

26-orchard house

First time on film

The history of the house, its inhabitants, and supporters have not been the subject of a documentary before. Once made, the film will offer highlights from each period of the house’s more than 300 year history and feature interviews with celebrity supporters of the house, such as Annie Leibovitz and John Matteson. Along with executive director Turnquist, the Orchard House Board of Directors and its many dedicated staff and volunteers are looking forward to this opportunity for progressive outreach.

 

For more information on
Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House:

Executive Director, Jan Turnquist jturnquist@louisamayalcott.org
Louisa May Alcott House Orchard House
399 Lexington Road
Concord, Massachusetts 01742
www.louisamayalcott.org

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/632439913/orchard-house 

Louisa May Alcott The Women Who Wrote Little Women by Julian Hawthorne

Check out this fascinating anecdote-rich article by an Alcott contemporary, Julian Hawthorne (son of Nathanial Hawthorne) Written in the 1920s he gives a unique perspective on the popularity of Little Women during the free-spirited flapper era. He also spills some gossip about he and Abby May. :-) Enjoy!

http://clickamericana.com/eras/1920s/louisa-may-alcott-the-woman-who-wrote-little-women-1922

Click to Tweet & ShareLouisa May Alcott The Women Who Wrote Little Women by Julian Hawthorne http://wp.me/p125Rp-1E1

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Susan’s ebook, “Game Changer” is now available From the Garret – download for free!

Holiday Greetings from Louisa May Alcott

louisa may alcott is my passion christmas card 2013

Click to Tweet & ShareHoliday Greetings from Louisa May Alcott http://wp.me/p125Rp-1CH

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I “met” Louisa May Alcott . . .

 . . . through the acting skills of Jan Turnquist, performer extraordinaire and director of Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House. From Jan’s website she writes, “Due to a ‘minor carriage accident,’ 20th century audiences have the opportunity to ‘meet’ Louisa May Alcott through the living history portrayal of Jan Turnquist.” She swept into the room in era costume, ‘apologizing’ for the intrusion, explaining about her carriage accident and how she would be with us for a few hours. Delighted that the audience ‘recognized’ her and knew of Little Women, “Louisa” then shared entertaining insight into her writings, her friendships with Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson, her father Bronson’s then-radical views on education, and other important 19th century issues such as suffrage, abolition and the underground railroad.

This performance was hosted by the Hingham (MA) Public Library as part of the ALA/NEH Louisa May Alcott initiative (see the Events page for a complete schedule).

Because the show was sold out, I had to stand in the lobby to watch and could only take in about half the show since the doors to the room had to be closed due to noise. But Jan’s performance definitely made me want to see more. I especially enjoyed her insights about Bronson and his educational methods. There were many teachers in the room and it was fun to see “Louisa” explaining her father’s methods and philosophy as if they were brand new and controversial while the audience knew they were very much in use.

I fantasized about what it would be like to be so immersed in Louisa’s character as to take questions from the audience and be able to answer in her own authentic voice. I sensed a lot of research and work going into something that looked so effortless to the casual observer.  And I marvel at the commitment of people like Jan, and the authors I’ve met through this blog, who devote so much time to Louisa so that others can know about her wonderful work. It certainly strengthened my resolve to keep up with my own immersion process.

Jan was kind enough to send me her performance schedule and I’ve posted it on the Events page (check under Massachusetts and Connecticut).

In the meantime I’ve assembled a quick slide show so you can see Jan during her performance. I highly recommend taking in this performance if you live in the area.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


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Rediscovering the late Madelon Bedell, author of The Alcotts Biography of a Family

I just ordered a bunch of new books and needed to rearrange my book shelves to get everything to fit. In the midst of the rearranging, I pulled out my copy of The Alcotts Biography of a Family and discovered a promotional photo of the author, Madelon Bedell, and an interview released by the publisher’s public relations division. Bedell has been on my mind since I found that her papers are now safe at Orchard House. Her biography of the Alcott family was a powerhouse  – a truly scholarly work published in 1980 that revealed at that time, many new and interesting facts and insights about the family. And yet this work is largely ignored by the public and is out of print (though fortunately available on the internet). Those in the ‘know’ appreciate its worth (and cite her work in theirs); I wanted to introduce you to Ms. Bedell in hopes that some of you will think about reading her book.

It’s tantalizing to think of those papers stored at Orchard House, including the only known interview with May’s daughter, Lulu Nieriker Rasim. Will someone perhaps take those papers and finish the work that Bedell was unable to do? I’d love to see it done . . .

Meanwhile, meet Madelon Bedell.

(This interview was part of a promotional package released by Clarkson N. Potter Inc./distributed by Crown Publishers, Inc.)

1.    How did you develop the idea of doing a biography of the Alcotts? And why did you choose to do a family biography instead of concentrating on only one member – Louisa May Alcott, or her father, Bronson Alcott, for instance?

My original idea was to do a series of critical essays on the image of women in the fiction of certain great women authors. I had in mind, Collette, Charlotte Bronte, Jane Austen, Doris Lessing, Willa Cather, and Louisa May Alcott. I decided to start with Alcott because I felt she would be the easiest to handle.

I found her life to be so fascinating that I decided to do a biography of her instead. As part of my research, I began also to study her father, Bronson Alcott. I found him so fascinating that I changed my mind again, and decided to do a dual, father-daughter biography. I worked on this project for some time, but I found it impossible to keep my spotlight focused on these two and their relationship with each other. The other Alcotts kept crowding in. Especially Abby Alcott, the mother, who would not stay in the minor role I had assigned to her, but insisted on intruding herself at nearly every point, sometimes overwhelming the action. After about two years of this kind of struggle, I gave in and decided to do the entire family.

2.    In your prologue, you state: “To find oneself in the lives of other people, long dead, why is this so entrancing an idea? It is the same for both reader and writer of biography, I am convinced: the need for self-validation . . .” If this means that biography explains ourselves to ourselves, how does the Alcott family explain the modern American family?

First of all in many specific ways. There are Bronson’s “infant diaries,” those astonishing records of his pioneering practices in child rearing, which forecast those of today. There’s the marriage of Bronson and Abby, both powerful personalities, a union of peers, in every way; unique then, still unusual today. And the all-female family with its ideals of feminism and independence for the daughters, all that is very modern.

But beyond that, the history of the Alcotts – which turns at every point, on the struggle to maintain the family unity against an inimical society – explains the ideal by which we measure our own families: the American family as a “haven in a heartless world.” Many of our strictures against the contemporary family stem from our disappointment in its failures to meet that ideal, I believe.

Moreover, the basic theme of the book – Bronson Alcott’s struggle against his family – his individualism versus their communalism – is a very modern one. The desire of each member for personal fulfillment meets up with and often must contend with the needs of the family as a whole – don’t we all face this problem, parents and children alike?

3.    The Alcott family history is supposed to be the true story behind the March family of Louisa May Alcott’s Little Women. Exactly how close is the book to real life?

Astoundingly so. The cast of characters is the same. Just substitute Bronson and Abby Alcott and their four daughters, Anna, Louisa, Lizzie and Abbie May, for the Reverend and Mrs. March and their four daughters, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy. There’s hardly an incident in Little Women that doesn’t recall or explain an event in the Alcott family.

What’s more interesting, perhaps, are the points where the novel departs from the real life story. There’s a lot of sentimentalization. The Marches aren’t as poor as the Alcotts – they employ a maid, for example. Nor are they are radical in their social views. The crisis in the family life, which occurred when the Englishman, Charles Lane, tried to separate Bronson from his family, is never referred to.

But I think the most important departure from reality is the departure of the father from the book. The figure of Bronson Alcott dominated the Alcott family scene in real life. In the book, the Reverend March is a pale imitation, who isn’t even present most of the time. When Louisa wrote up the family legend, she turned the family into an all-female society headed by a matriarch, thus removing the riveting sexual tensions which permeated the real scene. In Little Women, for all its realism, you have a fantasy – an adolescent fantasy where women never have to deal with the politics and passions of sex as the Alcott women did.

4.    The Alcotts has been cited as a work of unusual scholarship, filled with new material and fresh insights on this family and the nineteenth century in general. What is this new material and how and were did you find it?

All over the place! Basically, however, it’s material on the characters of Bronson and Abby Alcott which throws a new light on their marriage. I found them both to be much larger personalities than had been supposed. Previous biographers, inspired no doubt by Little Women and its (false) relation to the genteel tradition, had cast them as sexless, passive idealists, who weren’t very interesting.

But I found Bronson to be a driven person, obsessed by sex, who sometimes wrote erotic poetry and conceived a passion in middle age for a woman half his age, Ednah Littlehale; and before that may have had a homosexual attraction toward his English follower, Charles Lane, which, incidentally, his wife was aware of. And Abby herself, her feminism, her radical social theories, her drive for power, her unusual gift for love, all that is exposed for the first time, too.

As for the material behind this – it’s all in their diaries and letters, some 200 volumes of them, stored all these years at Harvard University. You can’t just skim these, unfortunately, but must turn yourself over to them, become the person yourself as you read him or her, and live with them, as they were in their times.

But, then must discard about 90% of all that wonderful material you have discovered, push aside those note cards – keeping them only for reference – and write the story as if it had come from your own mind, fresh and new. To be able to do that is the real challenge of biography.

5.    Your book deals with the various social movements of the nineteenth century of New England – feminism, health reform, the advent of child psychology and the cult of the child, Transcendentalism, the anti-slavery movement, utopian socialism, progressive education. What among these has survived today?

You’ve just named them all. The first half of the nineteenth century was the time when American liberal ideology was formulated. All these movements and the ideas of human growth and liberation, which they represent, were born then.

Our history goes in cycles and so these ideas are apt to go underground for a while and then surge forward again. The 1960’s were almost a repeat of the 1840’s, for example. The movement against the Vietnam War was characterized by the same moral fervor as was the anti-slavery movement of the 1840’s and 1850’s. The scene at the end of The Alcotts when Bronson Alcott takes part in the storming of the state house to rescue a runaway slave might well have taken place in the 1960’s – just substitute a draft register for a slave and the action and all the tumultuous feelings surrounding it are the same.

Or take such ideas as the current interest in holistic medicine. Except in its details it might be a replay of the health reform movement of the 1800’s in which the Alcotts were active. So, too, with feminism (Abby Alcott headed up a petition for women’s suffrage) and of course utopian socialism. Bronson Alcott’s commune at Fruitlands, in Harvard, Massachusetts, was a forerunner of similar groups that exist today.

6.    This is the first volume of your biography of the Alcotts. What will the second book be, and how will you approach it?

This first book deals primarily with the marriage of Bronson and Abby Alcott, and the childhood of the four daughters. The father is the central character (although the mother is the hero), and the theme is the founding of a family – the creation of a legend.

The next volume will deal with the adult lives of the four daughters, and focus on Louisa. The first book was also a social history of the antebellum – pre-Civil War – period in New England. The next one will be a similar account of the postwar period, showing how all those reform movements we talked about in the previous question, were overcome in the baronial capitalism of the Gilded  Age: how Bronson Alcott’s spiritual transcendentalism evolved into his daughter Louisa’s quite material, albeit enlightened capitalism.

7.    Which member of the Alcott family is your favorite?

If I had one, I would never tell anyone, not even myself. A biographer is like a parent. He/she must never play favorites, or the goal – the lives to be nourished and developed – will be lost.

The Alcotts Biography of a Family in hardcover was 416 pages in length and sold for $15.95. I wonder what the price would have been today . . .