A room of one’s own: what if your “room” could be portable?

Featured Image -- 6400

susanwbailey:

Louisa’s yearning for private space and her glorious room at Hillside/Wayside always made me crave a special space too. I never dreamed it could be portable!

Here’s a picture of where her room was in the house at Wayside. Nathaniel Hawthorne changed the house after he bought it from Bronson and Louisa’s little room no longer exists. But you can stand in the space where it was. Very cool.

 

Originally posted on Be As One:

What happens when you get the urge to create?

  • Do you retreat to a music studio to write a song?
  • Do you go to your specially designated study to write?
  • Do you paint your latest masterpiece in a light-filled studio?
  • Do you shut the door when you enter your room?

Why do secret hideaway places draw us like magnets?

I wanted a room of my own when I first discovered Louisa May Alcott as a kid. There was an illustration of Louisa in her special room where it was quiet and she could think. When she had finished writing her latest poem or story, she could indulge in her other favorite passion, running, by racing out the door to her room that led outside.

drawing by Flora Smith from The Story of Louisa May Alcott by Joan Howard

drawing by Flora Smith from The Story of Louisa May Alcott by Joan Howard

Getting away from the noise

Louisa’s family was noisy; quiet and privacy…

View original 399 more words

Concord in Autumn: walking the path Louisa walked

Concord, home to Louisa May Alcott. I have been a student of Louisa on and off, for most of my life. Back in August of 2010 I decided to commit myself to study and share my reflections with you. I have so enjoyed all the book discussions and your wonderful comments about our favorite author.

Autumn at its peak in front of the Concord Free Public Library

I have always visited Concord in autumn. Since I’ve immersed my life into Louisa’s, the visits have taken on a mystical quality, most especially in autumn. The colorful falling leaves, brilliant sunshine and crisp air make Louisa more alive to me than ever.

The Concord Free Public Library

Now that I’ve discovered that much of what is at Houghton Library at Harvard University is also available at the Concord Free Public Library through an extensive microfilm collection, I can easily access all I need to research this blog and a future book I wish to write. Concord is only 45 minutes away from home, and also close enough to where I work in Wellesley that I can go there after work to do research.

So today I spent a couple of hours reading Anna’s diary from 1840 (which I will be writing on once I finish it) and then decided to walk the path Louisa and her family walked so many times, from downtown Concord to Orchard House.

Continuing on to Orchard House

I took many pictures which I’m happy to share with you in this slide show.

Being able to read the words of family members in their own handwriting really adds to the mystical connection I feel with the Alcotts.

I am indeed very blessed! I look forward to sharing with you in the future what I’ve discovered from my reading.

In the meantime, enjoy your virtual walk from downtown Concord to Orchard House on a crisp and beautiful October day.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Click to Tweet & ShareConcord in Autumn: walking the path Louisa walked http://wp.me/p125Rp-1gH

Are you passionate about Louisa May Alcott too?
Send an email to louisamayalcottismypassion@gmail.com
to subscribe, and never miss a post!
Facebook Louisa May Alcott is My Passion
More About Louisa on Twitter

Susan’s ebook, “Game Changer” is now available From the Garret – download for free!

Louisa May Alcott Reading Challenge Update

2012 Summer reading challenge hosted at www.inthebookcase.blogspot.comHow are you doing on the Louisa May Alcott Summer Reading Challenge? I’ve been pecking away at the Little Women re-read along with a re-read of Louisa May Alcott: A Biography by Madeleine Stern. I’ve been keeping a casual reading journal for the latter and I’ll share some from that.

Still the best biography

Louisa May Alcott A Biography still stands for me as the definitive biography on Louisa. It was originally published in 1950 and updated in 1996.

Stern doesn’t waste a line – each one is pregnant with information! Yet, as dense as this book is, it doesn’t read as dry or scholarly, but more like a novel, and from the point of view of Louisa.

Reading from different perspectives

The first time I read this book I felt like I got into Louisa’s head and heart, living her life with her. I felt very sad when the book was done because the visit was too. But it was immensely satisfying.

This time I see it a new way. Stern’s thrust for the biography is Louisa the writer.  Every single event in her life revolves around how she can write about it. As an apprentice writer, I find this book to be an amazing teaching tool .

Here’s some examples of how Stern interpreted events as fodder for writing:

Life at Hillside

Stern describes the family’s life at Hillside as the culmination of so many of the things that fed Louisa’s happier writing. Little Women, which was based on part on that life, is a shining example.

Hillside had given Louisa a foundation of  stability to lean on for comfort during the leaner times, and fodder to draw upon for future stories.

Reading leads to doubt

Stern describes a crisis of confidence on young Louisa’s part as she read more and more of Emerson’s books from his library. She saw her limitations and stopped writing in her journal. Abba steps in to encourage her with a note in her journal:

“I’m sure your life has many fine passages well worth revealing and to me they are always precious … Do write a little each day, dear, but if a line, to show me how bravely you begin the battle, how patiently you wait for the rewards sure to come when the victory is nobly won.”

Turning the common into the extraordinary

Stern maps out Louisa’s influences, from Thoreau for Flower Fables to the Music Hall and divas Madame Sontag and Jenny Lind for The Rival Prima Donnas, written for The Saturday Evening Gazette. She writes, “surely no experience was too unimportant to serve as grist for the author’s mill …”

In her twenties, Louisa was leading a fairly uneventful life of hard work, mostly doing things she didn’t want to do. Such a grind could snuff out the inner life but not so with Louisa. Sterns writes of Louisa’s life fueling her ambition all the more: she meant to earn her living as a writer and therefore never missed an opportunity to develop life into a story.

It shows that you can lead a common life and still pull out the uncommon insights that turn these things into the extraordinary. You just need to have the eyes to see. Louisa excelled at that skill.

That’s my update for now. Are you participating in the challenge and if so, what are you reading?

Are you passionate about Louisa May Alcott too?
Send an email to louisamayalcottismypassion@gmail.com
to subscribe, and never miss a post!
Facebook Louisa May Alcott is My Passion
More About Louisa on Twitter

Coming to Concord this summer? Here’s some recommendations

The Wayside, home to Nathaniel Hawthorne and the Alcotts

I just created a page with personal recommendations of places to visit and things to do while visiting Concord, Massachusetts. The one thing I could not recommend is hotels because I live too close to Concord to have stayed overnight.

Here’s some recommendations for those of you who want to indulge in living history (to me, that’s fun :-)):

Come Visit Concord . . .

The core of Louisa May Alcott’s feminism explains her timelessness

After writing yesterday’s post on Polly’s modern sensibilities, I thought about what Louisa May Alcott’s core belief was which motivated her feminism, and why she was so effective in imparting it.

Autonomy

My conclusion? Louisa’s feminism was based on autonomy – the right of every woman to be autonomous,  the freedom for each woman to realize her true potential as a whole person. And even as I write this, I reflect back on Sarah Elbert’s essay on Moods where she incorporated Louisa’s transcendental upbringing into the mix.

Transcendentalism played a crucial role

As crazy as her father Bronson could be, he certainly associated with some very fine people (Thoreau, Emerson, Margaret Fuller, etc.). He also managed to have a brilliant idea or two. ;-)

Transcendentalism focused on individual development which involved introspection and scrutiny. Crucial to that development was the intimate connection with something greater than Self  by reconnecting with the natural world. God was to be found in that world but not as He had been traditionally understood.

But did Transcendentalism truly include women?

Since the vast majority of transcendentalists were male, they did not necessarily promote the same kind of individual development for women. It was probably too much to ask that they totally divorce themselves from the thinking of the day (especially when it benefited them so directly!).

A role model

However, Margaret Fuller spent many years giving ‘conversations’ to promote the idea of education for women. Her informal gatherings gave women some of the very few chances they had to learn, to reflect, and to share ideas on realizing their individual vocations. She presented quite a glamorous figure and was someone the then teen-aged Louisa admired and wished to emulate. Legend has it that when Louisa reflected on her life, making her 3 wishes at the wishing wheel located in the meadow above Hillside, that she wished for fame and travel – a life like Margaret Fuller’s.

Her upbringing influences her writing

So it makes perfect sense that all this seeped into Louisa’s writing, becoming an on-going theme. Much as she complained about writing “moral pap for the young,” these stories did much to promote her thinking that all women deserved a chance to be all they could be, leading deeper, more meaningful lives. It was far more than “moral pap”: it was a way of educating and influencing young girls, showing them that there were, in fact, choices they could make in their lives.

Timeless messages

Louisa did a lot of public campaigning for women through her attendance at national conferences, and she set the example by being the first woman to vote in the local Concord election. She courageously served as a Civil War nurse when the profession had just opened to women. And of course her tenacity in carving out a life as a best-selling literary spinster speaks volumes.

In the end however, it’s the simple and subtle messages inherent in her writing to children that continue to stand the test of time.  Just about every woman pioneer since Louisa’s era remembers reading Little Women and they point to Jo March as a pivotal inspiration.

Re-embracing feminism

Since I met Louisa long before I met Jo, Louisa is my pivotal inspiration. She was very much outside the mainstream and so am I (though in a quieter way); she gives me greater pride and confidence in that fact. Now that I am meeting her family of characters for the first time, I find it possible to re-embrace feminism; she has brought me back to its purer roots. Certainly the different political gains are important (the right to vote being crucial) but in the end, it’s really about a woman being given every chance to realize her full potential, just as every man is given that chance.

Louisa’s writing  makes me laugh, cry and think, and gives me a safe haven. This is one crazy and chaotic time that we’re living in – how wonderful that an author who lived 150 years ago could offer inspiration and safety to me, and to so many others too.

Want to book a vacation in Concord touring its literary treasures?

Here’s a brand new start-up company founded by two enterprising women who offer in-depth tours of the literary treasures of Concord, MA.  Gatepost Tours began last February and is taking off like a rocket. Friends Joan Spinazola and Alida Bailey are the co-owners. Sounds like a great way to spend a summer vacation! Check out this excerpt from the Boston.com article and click on the link to read the entire article.

New company celebrates
Concord’s literary history with tours

Posted by Sarah Thomas May 5, 2011

Joan Spinazola was a displaced Concordian, making a living offering “Mob Tours” in between stand-up comedy gigs in Las Vegas. Alida Bailey was a transplant from New Zealand who toured the Old Manse so many times she was eventually offered a job. Together, they’re Gatepost Tours – a new business that allows visitors to explore Concord’s literary history.

“We just started in February and already have tours booked through the summer,” said Bailey in an interview Wednesday. “Now we ask each other why we didn’t decide to try this sooner.”

Gatepost Tours joins many other groups offering tours through Concord with different hooks – after all, it is one of the most historically important towns in America, and has a rich cultural heritage. And many companies offer travelers the world over a glimpse into the writing life – Spinazola mentions Dickens tours through London and the home of Leo Tolstoy in Russia.

But Gatepost is special in that it has such a wide and significant stock of literary giants to explore – from Emerson and Thoreau to Hawthorne and Louisa May Alcott, along with all the other leading lights of their day who visited or briefly lived and worked in Concord.

Read the rest of the article here.

Why Louisa May Alcott has Dorothea Dix to thank for her nursing career

Here’s an interesting article about Dorothea Dix, the powerhouse behind the organizatio of women nurses for the Civil War (the first time women were allowed to serve as nurses). Louisa May Alcott served under Dix:

“ . . . Thirty-year-old Louisa May Alcott, the author of Little Women who nursed at Union Hospital in Washington, admired [Dorothea] Dix but steered clear of her personally, admitting that “no one likes her and I don’t wonder.”

Here’s the link to the full article by Judith Giesberg of the New York Times:
Ms. Dix Comes to Washington.

Louisa’s first successful book, Hospital Sketches, was based upon her experiences as a nurse at the Union Hotel Hospital in Washington, DC. She also wrote other essays and stories based upon her Civil War experiences which is compiled in a book called Louisa May Alcott’s Civil War (contains Hospital Sketches).

For those of you who live within earshot of Concord, there’s a free lecture taking place at The Wayside (next door to Orchard House) on May 25 at 7 pm called “Writing the Civil War.” Check out the Events page for details (scroll down to MASSACHUSETTS). I hope to attend, maybe I’ll see some of you there! While the subject matter is of great interest, seeing The Wayside is just as much of a draw since so much of Little Women was based on Louisa’s life at that house (formerly known as Hillside).