Boston is creating a Literary Cultural District: here are a couple of the places where Louisa May Alcott lived

I am very excited about this since I live an hour out of Boston. There are already many sites in Boston that are related to the Alcotts but having a literary cultural district is very cool. Here is more information about that effort: http://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/digital/retailing/article/61917-boston-creating-a-literary-cultural-district-spotlight-on-new-england-2014.html

In a quote from the article, the idea grew from a fortuitous conversation:

“The idea for a literary district grew out of a conversation between GrubStreet executive director Eve Bridburg and MCC head Anita Walker when the former bemoaned the fact that even though there is a lot happening culturally in Boston, you don’t often hear about the writers. The goal is to provide a series of walks through Boston’s literary history, while supporting writers and publishers working today. It’s also about including all the literary efforts in the city under one umbrella. “We’re thinking about branding the work that everybody is doing so that there’s one place to look for the literary arts,” says Bridburg, who plans to create a website to go with the district. “There’s a lot going on [in Boston] and everybody’s working in their own little silos.””

There are already many sites in Boston that concern Louisa May Alcott. The Alcotts moved so many times in their lifetime that it would be almost impossible to gather all the addresses. We do know, however, that in 1853, they lived for a time on Pinckney Street:

October 2003 20 Pinkney Street, Boston where the Alcotts lived in 1853Photos by Kim Wells, October 2003, editor Domestic Goddesses http://www.womenwriters.net/domesticgoddess

October 2003 20 Pinkney Street, Boston where the Alcotts lived in 1853
Photos by Kim Wells, October 2003, editor Domestic Goddesses http://www.womenwriters.net/domesticgoddess

Pinckney Street boasts other literary residents: “Pinckney Street formed a literary row with the childhood home of Henry David Thoreau at #4, Louisa May Alcott at #20, and Nathaniel Hawthorne at #54.” (from the aforementioned article)

Here is a previous post about a visit to Pinckney Street.

And Louisa bought a fine home in Louisberg Square:

from "Recollections of Louisa May Alcott" by Maria S. Porter

from “Recollections of Louisa May Alcott” by Maria S. Porter

 

There are so many other landmarks – King’s Chapel where Abba and her family worshipped, the original site of Roberts Brothers which published Little Women and subsequent books by Louisa, and “The Old Corner Bookstore was the original site of the publishing company Ticknor & Fields, founded in 1832, which published Harriet Beecher Stowe, Emerson, Longfellow, and Thoreau. The Atlantic Monthly also got its start there in 1857.” (Ibid)

Such a wonderful way to tour Boston – can’t wait!

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5 thoughts on “Boston is creating a Literary Cultural District: here are a couple of the places where Louisa May Alcott lived

  1. anievan says:

    Reblogged this on Tipsy Words and commented:
    I’m reblogging this from the Louisa May Alcott Is My Passion website. Isn’t this super-exciting!!!!!!!!!

    Thank you to the author of that blog for sharing it with the internet!

  2. anievan says:

    I hope it’s okay that I reblogged this! Thanks for sharing with us. I had no idea!

  3. qnpoohbear says:

    That sounds right up my alley. I have a book The Literary Trail of Greater Boston. I haven’t been to Boston to actually do any of the walks but I’ve been to a lot of the places anyway.

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