“A Memorable Evening at the Alcotts’ House” as recalled by Edward W. Emerson

I recently picked up a lovely volume from the library entitled Louisa May Alcott An Intimate Anthology, put together the by New York Public Library using materials from their archives.

What’s inside

The book contains stories and essays Louisa wrote about herself, excerpts from her journals, intimate poetry, short stories and recollections from friends.

Resistance
is futile … :-)

Although I already have much of what is in here, the book is so aesthetically pleasing with its squarish size, typography and illustrations that I know I’ll be visiting Amazon soon!

Who says print books are dead? Much as I love ebooks, there is still something very charming about a book like this.

Impressions from a neighbor

That being said, an essay by Edward W. Emerson, son of Ralph Waldo, caught my eye. What would be his impressions of his extraordinary neighbors, the Alcotts?

The home

Rare photo with the elm tree, from The Louisa May Alcott Collection at Brigham Young University http://net.lib.byu.edu/scm/alcott/adaptations.html

He obviously admired Orchard House and the simple elegance the Alcotts brought to it. Describing it as “extremely picturesque” with a “superb elm” which served as a “great parasol in summer,” he went on to describe the orchard of apple trees, “pink and white in May, and red and yellow in September” which gave the house its name.

The interior of the home was distinguished with plain and unpretentious décor. As an example, he described the windows as uncluttered with the usual array of curtains, shades and blinds which blocked the sun. Instead they were adorned simply with “pretty muslin curtains, made out of old party dresses:; the trees outside “temper[ed] the light.”

The sisters

An interesting side note is Edward’s description of Louisa for he obviously thought her to be the most physically attractive despite her boyish manner:

Louisa at the gate, drawn by May Alcott, from Louisa May Alcott An Intimate Anthology

“Louisa was very fine looking, had the most regular features of the family, and very handsome, wavy brown hair like her mother’s. She had always a rather masculine air, and a twinkle woke constantly in her eye at the comic side of things, a characteristic that carries many persons through hard experiences that crush or sour others. Her talk was always full of little catches from her favorite Dickens.”

He described Anna as “plain” with a sweet disposition and a quick sense of humor “without the ingredient of tartness that Louisa’s sometimes had.” May, “the darling of the family” was a “tall, well-made blond, the lower part of her face irregular, but she had beautiful blue eyes and brilliant yellow hair.”

“A memorable evening at the Alcotts’ house”

Edward elaborated on something I’ve longed wanted to know about: what was it like to spend an evening with the Alcotts? Biographies mention how the family would entertain neighbors on a weekly basis. What was it like to go over to Orchard House for a visit?

A typical visit to Orchard House began with a hearty greeting from Abba. Edward lauded the fact that everyone remained together calling it “bad taste” the way that young girls often slipped off to other rooms with their callers.

Parlor and dining room where gatherings took place. Courtesy of http:www.louisamayalcott.org

Enter Louisa

Louisa displayed her wicked wit and theatrical flair, appearing in costume as colorful characters from plays she had written. May, in high spirits, would play the piano encouraging raucous singing and dancing. As the evening wore down, “short stories on the porch might follow as twilight deepened into dark, and they were sufficiently ‘creepy.’”

Fun and games

The Alcotts loved their games such as pin-running and bean bag tossing. Edward remarked that to “play for a prize was unheard of. We played for fun, the best of prizes, and thus there was no unwholesome excitement …”

Young Edward with his mother Lidian

Warm memories, useful lessons

Reminiscing on those days, Edward celebrates the simple way that the Alcotts lived, noting that “Great pleasure may be had very simply and cheaply.” He continues,

“The family whose beautiful life I celebrate first made themselves happy in adversity by their methods, and later hundreds of others. One trait remains which I have hardly emphasized enough. I have never known a family who equaled the Alcotts in generosity, even in their poverty.”

Amusements

Is it possible to imagine a time without TV, video games, computers and mobile devices? Edward thought life in his time was becoming increasingly complicated even in household life and amusements. Imagine what he would have thought with the ways we entertain ourselves today!

Next time the power goes out, think about Orchard House, a warm gathering of neighbors, and simple games, songs, dance and stories that passed the time so pleasantly.

Click to Tweet & Share:“A Memorable Evening at the Alcotts’ House” as recalled by Edward W. Emerson http://wp.me/p125Rp-12U

About these ads

6 thoughts on ““A Memorable Evening at the Alcotts’ House” as recalled by Edward W. Emerson

  1. SilverSeason says:

    Do you have a date for the postcard with the picture of Orchard House with a very large tree in front of it? I used to collect specialized postcards and they are a wonderful source for old images, often dated if the card has a postmark or message on it.

    • susanwbailey says:

      Circa 1910. I was so pleased to find one with the elm tree. Elm trees as you know were just about wiped out with Dutch Elm disease which I think happened in the 60s.

      If you click on the postcard image, it will bring you to the website where I found it.

  2. Jillian22 says:

    What a beautiful post! Thank you for introducing me to a new book about Louisa, and sharing such an intimate evening at Orchard House! P.S. I also love the photo of Orchard House!

  3. Jillian22 says:

    Thank you for introducing me to a new book about Louisa, as well as sharing such an intimate portrait of life at Orchard House! P.S. I love the picture of Orchard House as well.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s