See a letter written by Louisa to her publisher regarding a sequel to Little Women

In conjunction with an exhibit at the Houghton Library at Harvard University entitled  Louisa May Alcott: Family Life & Publishing Ventures, Alcott scholars Daniel Shealy and Joel Myerson contributed a post to Houghton’s blog called “You’ve Got Mail” (highlighting various letters from Houghton’s vast collection) regarding a sequel to Little Women.

Here’s a tease. Be sure and click on the link to see the actual letter written by Louisa to Thomas Niles, her publisher.

You’ve Got Mail: Little Women II: Wedding Marches

Because Little Women is embedded in the American mind as a classic children’s book, readers often forget that Louisa May Alcott always viewed herself as a professional author who wrote in order to make money, much of which went to help support her parents and sisters, and later, nephews and a niece. Between 1868, when Little Women was published, and 1886, when Alcott recorded her last royalty statement, she received $103,375 from her publisher, Roberts Brothers. During that same stretch they printed 846,291 copies of her books, and between 1868 and 1898, when the firm was bought by Little, Brown, and Company, they printed 597,827 copies of Little Women in all its various formats. In comparison, Henry James earned $58,503 during the same period, and Herman Melville was paid, from all American and British sales of his books, $10,444.33 during his entire lifetime.

Click here to see the letter and the rest of the article.

Thanks to Two Nerdy History Girls: Breakfast Links: Week of May 21, 2012
By Isabella Bradford/Susan Holloway Scott for the tip!

Are you passionate about Louisa May Alcott too?
Send an email to louisamayalcottismypassion@gmail.com
to subscribe, and never miss a post!
Facebook Louisa May Alcott is My Passion
More About Louisa on Twitter

Beautiful Little Women book covers

Check out all the beautiful book covers of Little Women from its publication to the present – quite a collection. Nice summary too, here’s a tease:

 The Reference Guide to American Literature describes the creation of the book(s) in this way: “Alcott’s purpose in writing Little Women was not to create a nostalgic portrait of an idyllic childhood, though the book is often read as such. She wrote it to make money.” Horn Book’s article “Introduction to the Centennial Edition of Little Women” by Cornelia Meigs goes into a bit more detail on the matter. “In September, 1867, [Alcott] mentions in her diary that Mr. Thomas Niles of Roberts Brothers had asked her for a book for girls. It seems to have been somewhat of a shot in the dark even for him; for her it was even more unpromising than that. She agreed to try, but linked the task so little that she did not go on with it. Other and easier-seeming undertakings were allowed to come in the way and in May, 1867, she sent her father to Mr. Niles to ask him if he would not be interested in a fairy book. Thomas Niles answered firmly that he wanted a book for girls.” And so, dear reader, she did.

Click here to see the covers and read the rest. Thanks to Jeannine for the tip!

Are you passionate about Louisa May Alcott too?
Send an email to louisamayalcottismypassion@gmail.com
to subscribe, and never miss a post!
Facebook Louisa May Alcott is My Passion
More About Louisa on Twitter

Let’s celebrate! Scenes from Orchard House’s Centennial

You knew I couldn’t stay away and I didn’t! It was a picture-perfect day and I have lots of photos to share.

The house tour was done differently with a guide in every room which allotted lots of time for questions. :-) I was even able to identify the species of owl that May painted on Louisa’s fireplace. Watch the slide show for the reveal.

Pssst, a secret!  There is yet another new book out on Louisa, I found out from one of the tour guides. Not telling yet but I do have a copy to read … more to come, including an interview with the author.

Enjoy your virtual celebration of Orchard House’s 100th birthday!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Beth March as a doll

I received a wonderful email from the mother of Amelie Lasker, the young actress who portrayed Beth March in the Concord Players’ production of Little Women this past May (see past post for more on this play). She shared with me the sweet remembrance given to each March sister cast member, created by the costumers Pat Kane, Kathy Booth, Susie Appel and Tracy Wall. The doll is wearing the costume worn by Amelie in the first act of the play. The doll is even holding a kitten! Here’s a picture her husband Gary took – what a wonderful keepsake!

Photo by Gary Lasker

Are you passionate about Louisa May Alcott too?
Send an email to louisamayalcottismypassion@gmail.com
to subscribe, and never miss a post!
Facebook Louisa May Alcott is My Passion
More About Louisa on Twitter

Happy Birthday, Orchard House!

Today marks the official 100th birthday of Louisa May Alcott’s Orchard House as a museum. On May 17th, Carrie Hoyle (my maiden name, not sure if we’re related), secretary of the Louisa May Alcott Memorial Association sent a letter to John Alcott Pratt, son of Anna and adopted heir of Louisa, inviting him to Orchard House for its official opening.

Authentic homestead

As noted on the Orchard House website, no major structural changes were made to the house after the Alcotts vacated it, and approximately 80% of the furnishings are theirs. It makes for a very authentic tour experience, especially with different drawings and paintings on walls throughout the house by artist sister May.

Birthday activities

If you’re lucky enough to live near Concord, there are festivities taking place all weekend long at the museum including vintage dancers, 19th century children’s toys and games, silhouette artist, apple press/cider making, thematic tours, 1912 living history portrayers, birthday cake and popular 1912 refreshments. May27 activities also include a Centennial Legislative Proclamation and Postal Stamp Cancellation Ceremony.

Take a tour

If you can’t make it to Orchard House, you can take a virtual tour of each room!

The celebration continues

There are other events taking place in June including an exhibit of Annie Leibovitz’s photos from her book, Pilgrimage . Be sure and visit the Orchard House website to download a complete calendar of events.

My first visit and the aunt who changed my life

Here’s a picture of my first visit to Orchard House in 1963 when I was 7 (I’m the kid with the pigtails). My Aunt Petty (in the back row) gave me the children’s bio, The Story of Louisa May Alcott by Joan Howard which started this whole love affair with Louisa. :-) Thanks Aunt Petty!

Front row: My brother Tommy, me, my sister Chris
Back row: cousin Diane, Aunt Petty, Uncle Harold, my mom

Are you passionate about Louisa May Alcott too?
Send an email to louisamayalcottismypassion@gmail.com
to subscribe, and never miss a post!
Facebook Louisa May Alcott is My Passion
More About Louisa on Twitter

Today in Alcott history …

The American Literary Blog reports:

  • The first of what became four installments of Hospital Sketches was published in the magazine Boston Commonwealth on May 22, 1863.
  • Later, in book form, it carried the subtitle “An Army Nurse’s True Account of Her Experiences During the Civil War.”
  • The author, Louisa May Alcott, had spent about six weeks volunteering at a Union hospital outside of Washington, D.C. during the Civil War. Her letters home were the basis of the book.

You can read the rest of the post here.

Are you passionate about Louisa May Alcott too?
Send an email to louisamayalcottismypassion@gmail.com
to subscribe, and never miss a post!
Facebook Louisa May Alcott is My Passion
More About Louisa on Twitter

Be sure and check out Twitter and Facebook links – good stuff!

I found some great stuff today which I posted on Facebook and Twitter:

Click on the Facebook and Twitter icons to check these out!

           

Are you passionate about Louisa May Alcott too?
Send an email to louisamayalcottismypassion@gmail.com
to subscribe, and never miss a post!
Facebook Louisa May Alcott is My Passion
More About Louisa on Twitter