Ever pictured Louisa May Alcott as a Lego? This and other fun tidbits

I have a Google alert set up that sends me new links every week to anything relating to Louisa May Alcott. Just for fun, I thought I’d share some of the  interesting links with you.

The Vintage Book of American Women Writers
It, of course, includes our own LMA . . . this looks like an interesting read

Concord Players’ Newest Production
Louisa helped found this troupe back in 1856 and it’s a fine legacy for the would-be actress to have this group thriving.

Charlotte Cushman, an actress Louisa admired
So much so that Louisa based a character in Jo’s Boys on her . . . can you guess which one?

An extraordinary family names their farm after the school in Little Men and Jo’s Boys
See what this family does at their “Plumfield”

How about Louisa (and other favorite) authors as Legos? :-)

The Amy March Shirt of Justice! coming soon . . .
You know I wouldn’t buy one, but you might. :-)

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5 thoughts on “Ever pictured Louisa May Alcott as a Lego? This and other fun tidbits

  1. lisa :) says:

    Hahaha! I LOVE the Lego authors! Thanks for sharing it!

  2. SilverSeason says:

    You will probably get a link to this. The Nation is reviewing a new book about Fruitlands:

    “The Alcott season in heaven is the subject of Richard Francis’s new book, Fruitlands: The Alcott Family and Their Search for Utopia. ”

    What I get from the review is that the failure of Fruitlands was Mrs. Alcott’s fault. Insufficient faith? To my mind, she was the only one who kept food on the table.

    • susanwbailey says:

      Unfortunately I can’t read the article because I’m not a subscriber. Any chance you could email the article to me or give more details about it? Thanks.

    • susanwbailey says:

      You will appreciate this! In the introduction to the 1999 printing of Moods, Sarah Elberts writes this of Fruitlands: “Fruitlands failed but the Alcotts miraculously survived as a family, largely because Abigail May Alcott subsequently rallied herself and her two eldest daughters, Anna and Louisa, to become breadwinners as well as breadmakers for the entire family.”

      Now didn’t Bronson ultimately think as a Transcendentalist that spiritual perfection began with the family unit? Interesting . . . :-)

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